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The Cambridge World History of Slavery

Volume 3. AD 1420–AD 1804

$194.00 (R)

Part of The Cambridge World History of Slavery

David Eltis, Stanley L. Engerman, Ehud R. Toledano, Rudolph T. Ware III, G. Ugo Nwokeji, Roquinaldo Ferreira, William G. Clarence-Smith, Kerry Ward, Pamela Kyle Crossley, Leland Donald, Neil L. Whitehead, Richard Hellie, Edgar Melton, William D. Phillips, Jr, João Fragoso, Ana Rios, Philip D. Morgan, Lorena S. Walsh, Laurent Dubois, Pieter Emmer, B. W. Higman, Richard Price, Betty Wood, David Richardson, Sue Peabody, Timothy Coates, Joseph E. Inikori, Mary Turner, Manolo Florentino, Márcia Amantino
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  • Date Published: July 2011
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521840682

$194.00 (R)
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About the Authors
  • Volume 3 of The Cambridge World History of Slavery is a collection of essays exploring the various manifestations of coerced labor in Africa, Asia, and the Americas between the opening up of the Atlantic World and the formal creation of the new nation of Haiti. The authors, well-known authorities in their respective fields, place slavery in the foreground of the collection but also examine other types of coerced labor. Essays are organized both nationally and thematically and cover the major empires, coerced migration, slave resistance, gender, demography, law, and the economic significance of coerced labor. Non-scholars will also find this volume accessible.

    • The only in-depth treatment of slavery around the world
    • The broad geographic coverage of slavery and of different aspects of slavery and the slave experience make this an unbeatable resource for the study of slavery
    • Essays by authors who are leading scholars in their respective fields
    Read more

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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2011
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521840682
    • length: 776 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 160 x 47 mm
    • weight: 1.18kg
    • contains: 8 b/w illus. 3 maps 19 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. Dependence, servility and coerced labor in time and space David Eltis and Stanley L. Engerman
    Part I. Slavery in Africa and Asia Minor:
    2. Slavery in the Ottoman Empire in the early modern era Ehud R. Toledano
    3. Slavery in Islamic Africa Rudolph T. Ware III
    4. Slavery in non-Islamic West Africa, 1420–1820 G. Ugo Nwokeji
    5. Slaving and resistance to slaving in west central Africa Roquinaldo Ferreira
    6. White slavery in the early modern era William G. Clarence-Smith and David Eltis
    Part II. Slavery in Asia:
    7. Slavery in Southeast Asia, 1420–1804 Kerry Ward
    8. Slavery in early modern China Pamela Kyle Crossley
    Part III. Slavery among the Indigenous Americans:
    9. Slavery in indigenous North America Leland Donald
    10. Indigenous slavery in South America, 1492–1820 Neil L. Whitehead
    Part IV. Slavery and Serfdom in Eastern Europe:
    11. Slavery and the rise of serfdom in Russia Richard Hellie
    12. Manorialism and rural subjection in east central Europe, 1500–1800 Edgar Melton
    Part V. Slavery in the Americas:
    13. Slavery in the Atlantic islands and the early modern Spanish Atlantic world William D. Phillips, Jr
    14. Slavery and politics in colonial Portuguese America: the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries João Fragoso and Ana Rios
    15. Slavery in the British Caribbean Philip D. Morgan
    16. Slavery on the colonial North American mainland Lorena S. Walsh
    17. Slavery in the French Caribbean, 1635–1804 Laurent Dubois
    18. Slavery and the slave trade of the minor Atlantic powers Pieter Emmer
    Part VI. Cultural and Demographic Patterns in the Americas:
    19. Demography and family structures B. W. Higman
    20. The concept of creolization Richard Price
    21. Black women in the early Americas Betty Wood
    Part VII. Legal Structures, Economics and the Movement of Coerced Peoples in the Atlantic World:
    22. Involuntary migration in the early modern world, 1500–1800 David Richardson
    23. Slavery, freedom and the law in the Atlantic world, 1420–1807 Sue Peabody
    24. European forced labor in the early modern era Timothy Coates
    25. Transatlantic slavery and economic development in the Atlantic world: West Africa, 1450–1850 Joseph E. Inikori
    Part VIII. Slavery and Resistance:
    26. Slave worker rebellions and revolution in the Americas to 1804 Mary Turner
    27. Runaways and quilombolas in the Americas Manolo Florentino and Márcia Amantino.

  • Editors

    David Eltis, Emory University, Atlanta
    David Eltis is Robert W. Woodruff Professor of History at Emory University and research associate of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute, Harvard University. He has also held visiting appointments at Harvard and Yale universities. Eltis received his Ph.D. from the University of Rochester in 1979. He is most recently author of The Rise of African Slavery in the Americas and co-compiler of The Transatlantic Slave Trade: A Database on CD-ROM and its successor on www.slavevoyages.org. He co-edited Extending the Frontiers: Essays on the New Transatlantic Slave Trade Database (with David Richardson) and Slavery in the Development of the Americas (with Frank D. Lewis and Kenneth L. Sokoloff) and edited Coerced and Free Migrations: Global Perspectives.

    Stanley L. Engerman, University of Rochester, New York
    Stanley L. Engerman is John H. Munro Professor of Economics and Professor of History at the University of Rochester. He has also previously taught at Yale, Oxford and Cambridge universities. Engerman received his Ph.D. in economics from Johns Hopkins University in 1962. He is the author of Slavery, Emancipation, and Freedom: Comparative Perspectives and the co-author of Time on the Cross: The Economics of American Negro Slavery (with Robert Fogel) and Naval Blockades in Peace and War: An Economic History Since 1750 (with Lance E. Davis). He is also co-editor of A Historical Guide to World Slavery (with Seymour Drescher), Finance, Intermediaries, and Economic Development (with Philip T. Hoffman, Jean-Laurent Rosenthal and Kenneth L. Sokoloff) and The Cambridge Economic History of the United States (with Robert E. Gallman).

    Contributors

    David Eltis, Stanley L. Engerman, Ehud R. Toledano, Rudolph T. Ware III, G. Ugo Nwokeji, Roquinaldo Ferreira, William G. Clarence-Smith, Kerry Ward, Pamela Kyle Crossley, Leland Donald, Neil L. Whitehead, Richard Hellie, Edgar Melton, William D. Phillips, Jr, João Fragoso, Ana Rios, Philip D. Morgan, Lorena S. Walsh, Laurent Dubois, Pieter Emmer, B. W. Higman, Richard Price, Betty Wood, David Richardson, Sue Peabody, Timothy Coates, Joseph E. Inikori, Mary Turner, Manolo Florentino, Márcia Amantino

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