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Making a New Deal
Industrial Workers in Chicago, 1919–1939

2nd Edition

$29.99

textbook
  • Date Published: January 2008
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521715355

$29.99
Paperback

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About the Authors
  • This book examines how it was possible and what it meant for ordinary factory workers to become effective unionists and national political participants by the mid-1930s. We follow Chicago workers as they make choices about whether to attend ethnic benefit society meetings or to go to the movies, whether to shop in local neighborhood stores or patronize the new A & P. Although workers may not have been political in traditional terms during the '20s, as they made daily decisions like these, they declared their loyalty in ways that would ultimately have political significance. As the depression worsened in the 1930s, not only did workers find their pay and working hours cut or eliminated, but the survival strategies they had developed during the 1920s were undermined. Looking elsewhere for help, workers adopted new ideological perspectives and overcame longstanding divisions among themselves to mount new kinds of collective action. Chicago workers' experiences as citizens, ethnics and blacks, wage earners and consumers all converged to make them into New Deal Democrats and CIO unionists. First printed in 1990, Making a New Deal has become an established classic in American History. The second edition includes a new introductory essay by Lizabeth Cohen.

    • Winner of the Bancroft Prize and the Philip Taft Award for Labor History
    • An established classic in the field, widely used in graduate and undergraduate classes
    • In a new preface Cohen comments on recent scholarship and the impact of the book
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    Product details

    • Edition: 2nd Edition
    • Date Published: January 2008
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521715355
    • length: 570 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 29 mm
    • weight: 0.75kg
    • contains: 37 b/w illus. 2 maps 15 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Introduction
    1. Living and working in Chicago in 1919
    2. Ethnicity in the New Era
    3. Encountering mass culture
    4. Contested loyalty at the workplace
    5. Adrift in the Great Depression
    6. Workers make a New Deal
    7. Becoming a union rank and file
    8. Workers' common ground
    Conclusion.

  • Author

    Lizabeth Cohen, Harvard University, Massachusetts
    Lizabeth Cohen is the Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies in the history department of Harvard University. She is also the author of A Consumers' Republic: The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America (2003) and co-author with David M. Kennedy of The American Pageant, a college-level U.S. history textbook.

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