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The Deutsche Bank and the Nazi Economic War against the Jews
The Expropriation of Jewish-Owned Property

$29.00 ( ) USD

  • Date Published: January 2005
  • availability: This item is not supplied by Cambridge University Press in your region. Please contact eBooks.com for availability.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9780511032684

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  • Deutsche Bank, Germany's largest financial institution, played an important role in the expropriation of Jewish-owned enterprises during the Nazi dictatorship, both in the existing territories of Germany, and in the areas seized by the German army during World War II, particularly Austria, Czechoslovakia, and Poland. Drawing on new and previously unavailable materials, including branch records, and many from the Bank's own archives, Harold James examines policies that led to the eventual Genocide of European Jews. How much did the realization of the Nazi ideology depend on the acquiescence, the complicity, and the cupidity of individuals and economic institutions? Contradicting the traditional view that businesses were motivated by profit to cooperate with the Nazi regime, James closely examines the behavior of the bank and its individuals to suggest other motivations. James' unparalleled access and unusual perspective distinguishes this work as the only book to examine one company's involvement in the economic persecution of the Jews in Nazi Germany. Harold James is Professor of History at Princeton University. He is a member of the Independent Commission of Experts investigating the political and economic links of Switzerland with Nazi Germany, and of commissions to examine the roles of Deutsche Bank and Dresdner Bank. He is the author of several books on Germany economy and society, including Germany: The German Slump (Oxford University Press, 1986), A Germany Identity 1770-1990 (Routledge, 1993), and International Monetary Cooperation Since 1945 (Oxford University Press, 1996). He co-edited several books, including The Role of Banks in the Interwar Economy (Cambridge, 1991). James was also co-author of an earlier history of the commercial bank Deutsche Bank (Deutsche Bank 1870-1995, Weidenfeld and Nicholson, 1995) which won the Financial Times Global Business Book Award in 1996. He lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

    • Uses new material to describe the role of Germany's largest bank in the Nazi dictatorship and the Holocaust
    • Looks at the role of individuals in the bank, and questions the bank's responsibilities
    • Investigates the controversial question of the profits involved in looting Jewish property in Germany and Central Europe
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "...controversial...moving." Journal of Modern History

    "James has produced an intelligent and informative work...indispensable to the study of financial institutions under the Nazi regime...Despite all the complex financial analysis, James never loses sight of the moral issues involved." Canadian Journal of History

    "James weaves institutional, biographical material, and case studies together to form a multifaceted history of his subject." Enterprise and Society

    "This is a thorough picture of one company's role in the economic persecution of German Jews." www.hbsworkingknowledge.hbs.edu

    "...James must be commended for his careful research and his measured yet damning assessment of the Deutsche Bank's behavior during the Third Reich." German Studies Review

    "This study provides solid, important research on 'Aryanization'." American Historical Review

    "...this is a very well-written, scholarly narrative, largely based on unpublished primary sources skillfully questioned by a committed historian." Business History Review, Christopher Kobrak, ESCP-EAP

    "Persuasive." Books and Art

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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2005
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9780511032684
    • contains: 1 b/w illus.
    • availability: This item is not supplied by Cambridge University Press in your region. Please contact eBooks.com for availability.
  • Table of Contents

    Preface of the historical commission appointed to examine the history of the Deutsche bank in the period of national socialism
    Author's preface
    Selected abbreviations
    1. Business and politics: banks and companies in Nazi Germany
    2. The structure, organization, and economic environment of Deutsche bank
    3. National socialism and banks
    4. The problem of 'Aryanization'
    5. Deutsche bank and 'Aryanization' in the pre-1938 boundaries of Germany
    6. Deutsche bank abroad: 'Aryanization', territorial expansion, and economic reordering
    7. Jewish-owned bank accounts
    8. The profits of the Deutsche bank
    9. Some concluding reflections
    Notes
    Bibliography
    Index.

  • Author

    Harold James, Princeton University, New Jersey

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