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Words of the World
A Global History of the Oxford English Dictionary

$29.99

textbook
  • Date Published: December 2012
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107605695

$29.99
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About the Authors
  • Most people think of the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) as a distinctly British product. Begun in England 150 years ago, it took more than 60 years to complete and, when it was finally finished in 1928, the British prime minister heralded it as a 'national treasure.' It maintained this image throughout the twentieth century, and in 2006 the English public voted it an ‘Icon of England’, alongside Marmite, Buckingham Palace, and the bowler hat. But this book shows that the dictionary is not as 'British' as we all thought. The linguist and lexicographer, Sarah Ogilvie, combines her insider knowledge and experience with impeccable research to show that the OED is in fact an international product in both its content and its making. She examines the policies and practices of the various editors, applies qualitative and quantitative analysis, and finds new OED archival materials in the form of letters, reports, and proofs. She demonstrates that the OED, in its use of readers from all over the world and its coverage of World English, is in fact a global text.

    • Controversial, as it is the first book to challenge the received view on how editors of the past treated foreign words and World Englishes in the OED
    • Written by an OED editor, so gives readers a firsthand view of life inside the OED and an insight into how a lexicographer approaches the topic
    • Provides new insights into the compilation of the OED, the contexts in which it developed, and the personalities involved in its construction
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    Reviews & endorsements

    “A penetrating and brilliantly conceived work that decisively refutes the assumption that Victorian prejudice disposed the original editors of the OED to neglect foreign loanwords and non-British English. Ogilvie writes with a refreshingly brisk intelligence.” --Sidney Landau, author of Dictionaries: the Art and Craft of Lexicography

    “Sarah Ogilvie, by forensically examining the OED text, demonstrates convincingly that, as envisaged by James Murray, it was a truly international enterprise, in both its contributors and the World Englishes represented.” --Howard Jackson, Emeritus Professor of English Language & Linguistics, Birmingham City University

    “Sarah Ogilvie brings a unique conjunction of abilities to this book: deep practical knowledge of OED and its archives, powerful analytical skills, and personal warmth and flair as a storyteller.” --John Considine, University of Alberta

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    Product details

    • Date Published: December 2012
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107605695
    • length: 256 pages
    • dimensions: 227 x 152 x 12 mm
    • weight: 0.43kg
    • contains: 56 b/w illus.
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. Entering the OED
    2. A global dictionary from the beginning
    3. James Murray and words of the world
    4. James Murray and the Stanford Dictionary controversy
    5. William Craigie, Charles Onions, and the mysterious case of the vanishing tramlines
    6. Robert Burchfield and words of the world in the OED Supplements
    7. Conclusion.

  • Author

    Sarah Ogilvie, Australian National University, Canberra
    Sarah Ogilvie is Director of the Australian National Dictionary Centre, Reader in Linguistics at the Australian National University and Chief Editor of Oxford Dictionaries, Australia. Prior to that she was Alice Tong Sze Research Fellow at Cambridge University. She has a doctorate in linguistics from the University of Oxford and worked for many years as an editor on the Oxford English Dictionary in England and the Macquarie and Oxford dictionaries in Australia.

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