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Look Inside The Evolution of Human Language

The Evolution of Human Language
Biolinguistic Perspectives

$49.99

textbook

Part of Approaches to the Evolution of Language

Marc Hauser, Noam Chomsky, W. Tecumseh Fitch, Ray Jackendoff, Peter Gärdenfors, Mathias Osvath, Michael Corballis, Dan Sperber, Gloria Origgi, Daniel Dor, Eva Jablonka, Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini, Philip Lieberman, Karin Stromswold, Ian Tattersall, Derek Bickerton, Paul Bingham
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  • Date Published: February 2010
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521736251

$49.99
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About the Authors
  • The way language as a human faculty has evolved is a question that preoccupies researchers from a wide spread of disciplines. In this book, a team of writers has been brought together to examine the evolution of language from a variety of such standpoints, including language's genetic basis, the anthropological context of its appearance, its formal structure, its relation to systems of cognition and thought, as well as its possible evolutionary antecedents. The book includes Hauser, Chomsky, and Fitch's seminal and provocative essay on the subject, 'The Faculty of Language,' and charts the progress of research in this active and highly controversial field since its publication in 2002. This timely volume will be welcomed by researchers and students in a number of disciplines, including linguistics, evolutionary biology, psychology, and cognitive science.

    • An up-to-date look at the highly controversial subject of language evolution that allows readers to stay in touch with modern developments
    • Organised around what is arguably the most important recent article on the evolution of human language
    • Includes work by leading specialists, some of whom (Chomsky and Tattersall) have never before discussed the subject of language evolution in a single-authored paper
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    Product details

    • Date Published: February 2010
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521736251
    • length: 280 pages
    • dimensions: 228 x 152 x 14 mm
    • weight: 0.45kg
    • contains: 6 b/w illus.
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    List of figures
    Introduction
    1. The faculty of language: what is it, who has it, and how did it evolve? Marc Hauser, Noam Chomsky and W. Tecumseh Fitch
    Part I. Language Architecture:
    2. Some simple evo-devo theses: how true might they be for language? Noam Chomsky
    3. Your theory of the evolution of language depends on your theory of language Ray Jackendoff
    4. Three meanings of 'recursion': key distinctions for biolinguistics W. Tecumseh Fitch
    5. On obfuscation, obscurantism and opacity: evolving conceptions of the faculty of language Marc Hauser
    Part II. Language and Interface Systems:
    6. The evolution of anticipatory cognition as a precursor to symbolic communication Peter Gärdenfors and Mathias Osvath
    7. Did language evolve before speech? Michael Corballis
    8. A pragmatic perspective on the evolution of language Dan Sperber and Gloria Origgi
    Part III. Biological and Neurological Foundations:
    9. Canalization and plasticity in the evolution of linguistic communication: an evolutionary-developmental approach Daniel Dor and Eva Jablonka
    10. What is language, that it might have evolved, and what is evolution that is may apply to language? Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini
    11. The creative capacity of language, in what manner is it unique, and who had it? Philip Lieberman
    12. Genetics and the evolution of language: what genetic studies reveal about the evolution of language Karin Stromswold
    Part IV. Anthropological Context:
    13. A putative role for language in the origin of human consciousness Ian Tattersall
    14. On two incompatible theories of language evolution Derek Bickerton
    15. On the evolution of language: implications of a new and general theory of human evolution, properties and history Paul Bingham
    Notes
    Index.

  • Instructors have used or reviewed this title for the following courses

    • Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy
    • Seminar on the Evolution of Language
  • Editors

    Richard K. Larson, State University of New York, Stony Brook
    Richard K. Larson is Professor of Linguistics at Stony Brook University, New York.

    Viviane Déprez, Rutgers University, New Jersey
    Viviane Depréz is Associate Professor of Linguistics at Rutgers University, New Jersey.

    Hiroko Yamakido, Lawrence University, Wisconsin
    Hiroko Yamakido is Assistant Professor of Japanese and Linguistics at Lawrence University, Wisconsin.

    Contributors

    Marc Hauser, Noam Chomsky, W. Tecumseh Fitch, Ray Jackendoff, Peter Gärdenfors, Mathias Osvath, Michael Corballis, Dan Sperber, Gloria Origgi, Daniel Dor, Eva Jablonka, Massimo Piattelli-Palmarini, Philip Lieberman, Karin Stromswold, Ian Tattersall, Derek Bickerton, Paul Bingham

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