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The Verb Phrase in English
Investigating Recent Language Change with Corpora

$110.00 (Z)

Part of Studies in English Language

Bas Aarts, Joanne Close, Geoffrey Leech, Sean Wallis, Mark Davies, Nicholas Smith, Douglas Biber, Bethany Gray, Sali Tagliamonte, Manfred Krug, Ole Schützler, Magnus Levin, Meike Pfaff, Alexander Bergs, Thomas Hoffmann, Marcus Callies, José Ramón Varela Pérez, Gunther Kaltenböck, Jill Bowie, Christopher Williams, Stig Johansson
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  • Date Published: April 2013
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107016354

$110.00 (Z)
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About the Authors
  • The chapters in this volume feature new and groundbreaking research carried out by leading scholars and promising young researchers from around the world on recent changes in the English verb phrase. Drawing on authentic corpus data, the papers consider both spoken and written English in several genres. Each contribution pays particular attention to the methodologies used for investigating short-term patterns of change in English, with detailed discussions of controversies in this area. This cutting-edge collection is essential reading for historians of the English language, syntacticians and corpus linguists.

    • Provides details of ongoing changes in the English verb phrase and therefore an insight into changes taking place in contemporary language
    • Highlights the importance of methodology in studies of language change by exposing readers to a range of methodological approaches to studying recent language changes
    • Features new and groundbreaking research carried out by leading scholars and promising new researchers from around the world
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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2013
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107016354
    • length: 474 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 27 mm
    • weight: 0.8kg
    • contains: 113 b/w illus. 92 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction Bas Aarts, Joanne Close, Geoffrey Leech and Sean Wallis
    2. Choices over time: methodological issues in investigating current change Bas Aarts, Joanne Close and Sean Wallis
    3. Recent shifts with three nonfinite verbal complements in English: data from the 100 million word TIME Corpus (1920s–2000s) Mark Davies
    4. Verb structures in twentieth-century British English Nicholas Smith and Geoffrey Leech
    5. Nominalizing the verb phrase in academic science writing Douglas Biber and Bethany Gray
    6. The verb phrase in contemporary Canadian English Sali Tagliamonte
    7. Recent change and grammaticalization Manfred Krug and Ole Schützler
    8. The progressive verb in modern American English Magnus Levin
    9. I was just reading this article - on the expression of recentness and the English past progressive Meike Pfaff, Alexander Bergs and Thomas Hoffmann
    10. Bare infinitival complements in present-day English Marcus Callies
    11. Operator and negative contraction in spoken British English: a change in progress José Ramón Varela Pérez
    12. The development of comment clauses Gunther Kaltenböck
    13. The perfect in spoken British English Jill Bowie, Sean Wallis and Bas Aarts
    14. Changes in the verb phrase in legislative language in English Christopher Williams
    15. Modals and semi-modals of obligation in American English: some aspects of developments from 1990 until the present day Stig Johansson.

  • Editors

    Bas Aarts, University College London
    Bas Aarts is Professor of English Linguistics and Director of the Survey of English Usage at University College London.

    Joanne Close, University of Chester
    Joanne Close is Lecturer in English Language in the English Department at the University of Chester.

    Geoffrey Leech, Lancaster University
    Geoffrey Leech is Professor Emeritus of English Linguistics at Lancaster University.

    Sean Wallis, University College London
    Sean Wallis is a Senior Research Fellow in the Survey of English Usage at University College London.

    Contributors

    Bas Aarts, Joanne Close, Geoffrey Leech, Sean Wallis, Mark Davies, Nicholas Smith, Douglas Biber, Bethany Gray, Sali Tagliamonte, Manfred Krug, Ole Schützler, Magnus Levin, Meike Pfaff, Alexander Bergs, Thomas Hoffmann, Marcus Callies, José Ramón Varela Pérez, Gunther Kaltenböck, Jill Bowie, Christopher Williams, Stig Johansson

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