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Gesture, Segment, Prosody

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Part of Papers in Laboratory Phonology

Sarah Hawkins, Catherine P. Browman, Louis Goldstein, Mary Beckman, Janet Pierrehumbert, David Talkin, Nigel Hewlett, Linda Shockey, Michael Broe, John Ohala, John Local, Aditi Lahiri, William Marslen-Wilson, Francis Nolan, Anne Cutler, Lieselotte Schiefer, D. Robert Ladd, Rob Van Den Berg, Haruo Kubozono, Amalia Arvanti
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  • Laboratory phonology uses speech data to research questions about the abstract categorical structures of phonology. This collection of papers broadly addresses three such questions: What structures underlie the temporal coordination of articulatory gestures? What is the proper role of segments and features in phonological description? and What structures--hierarchical or otherwise--relate morphosyntax to prosody? In order to encourage the interdisciplinary understanding required for progress in this field, each of the three groups of papers is preceded by a tutorial paper (commissioned for this volume) on theories and findings presupposed by some or all of the papers in the group. In addition, most of the papers are followed by commentaries, written by noted researchers in phonetics and phonology, which serve to bring important theoretical and methodological issues into perspective. Most of the material collected here is based on papers presented at the Second Conference on Laboratory Phonology in Edinburgh, 1989. The volume is a sequel to Kingston and Beckman (eds.): Papers in Laboratory Phonology I also published by Cambridge University Press.

    • Follows Papers in Laboratory Phonology I (1990), by Kingston and Beckman
    • The contributors are notable figures in their fields
    • Their papers arise from a conference on the subject, held in Edinburgh in 1989, and each is followed by a commentary and response from one or more other scholars
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    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2011
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9780511832710
    • availability: Adobe Reader ebooks available from eBooks.com
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    Part I. Gesture:
    1. An introduction to task dynamics Sarah Hawkins
    2. 'Targetless' Schwa: an articulatory analysis Catherine P. Browman and Louis Goldstein
    3. Prosodic structure and tempo in a sonority model of articulatory dynamics Mary Beckman et al.
    4. Lenition of /h/and glottal stop Janet Pierrehumbert and David Talkin
    5. On types of coarticulation Nigel Hewlett and Linda Shockey
    Part II. Segment:
    6. An introduction to feature geometry Michael Broe
    7. The segment: primitive or derived? John Ohala
    8. Modelling assimilation in non-segmental, rule-free synthesis John Local
    9. Lexical processing and phonological representation Aditi Lahiri and William Marslen-Wilson
    10. The descriptive role of segments: evidence from assimilation Francis Nolan
    11. Psychology and the segment Anne Cutler
    12. Trading relations in the perception of stops and their implications for a phonological theory Lieselotte Schiefer
    Part III. Prosody:
    13. An introduction to intonational phonology D. Robert Ladd
    14. Downstep in Dutch: implications for a model Rob Van Den Berg et al.
    15. Modelling syntactic effects on downstep in Japanese Haruo Kubozono
    16. Secondary stress: evidence from modern Greek Amalia Arvanti.

  • Editors

    Gerard J. Docherty, University of Newcastle upon Tyne

    D. Robert Ladd, University of Edinburgh

    Contributors

    Sarah Hawkins, Catherine P. Browman, Louis Goldstein, Mary Beckman, Janet Pierrehumbert, David Talkin, Nigel Hewlett, Linda Shockey, Michael Broe, John Ohala, John Local, Aditi Lahiri, William Marslen-Wilson, Francis Nolan, Anne Cutler, Lieselotte Schiefer, D. Robert Ladd, Rob Van Den Berg, Haruo Kubozono, Amalia Arvanti

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