Skip to content
Open global navigation

Cambridge University Press

AcademicLocation selectorSearch toggleMain navigation toggle
Cart
Register Sign in Wishlist

Agricultural Subsidies in the WTO Green Box
Ensuring Coherence with Sustainable Development Goals

$159.99

Christophe Bellmann, Jonathan Hepburn, Néstor Stancanelli, Alan Swinbank, David Orden, Masayoshi Honma, Jesús Antón, Carlos Galperín, Ivana Doporto Miguez, Vincent Chatellier, Harry de Gorter, André Nassar, Maria Elba Rodriguez-Alcalá, Cinthia C. Costa, Biswajit Dhar, Jianmin Xie, Abena Oduro, Ron Steenblik, Charles Tsai, Ariel Brunner, Harry Huyton, Jane Earley, Tim Josling, Freeman Spogli, David Blandford, Andrea Cerda, Teresa Cavero, Ann Tutwiler, Pedro de Camargo Neto, Renato Henz
View all contributors
  • Date Published: January 2010
  • availability: Temporarily unavailable - no date available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521519694

$159.99
Hardback

Temporarily unavailable - no date available
Unavailable Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Do the World Trade Organization's rules on 'green box' farm subsidies allow both rich and poor countries to achieve important goals such as food security, or do they worsen poverty, distort trade and harm the environment? Current WTO requirements set no ceiling on the amount of green box subsidies that governments can provide, on the basis that these payments cause only minimal trade distortion. Governments are thus increasingly shifting their subsidy spending into this category, as they come under pressure to reduce subsidies that are more directly linked to production. However, growing evidence nonetheless suggests that green box payments can affect production and trade, harm farmers in developing countries and cause environmental damage. By bringing together new research and critical thinking, this book examines the relationship between green box subsidies and the achievement of sustainable development goals, and explores options for future reform.

    • Examines the issue of green box subsidies from a sustainable development perspective, as opposed to a purely economic or legal viewpoint
    • Addresses a set of farm subsidies that are of increasing importance, enabling the reader to engage critically with a new and important field of analysis
    • Offers analysis and opinions from a range of leading thinkers in the field, who are expected to inform the emerging debate in this area
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: January 2010
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521519694
    • length: 706 pages
    • dimensions: 233 x 160 x 35 mm
    • weight: 1.22kg
    • availability: Temporarily unavailable - no date available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Overview Christophe Bellmann and Jonathan Hepburn
    Part I. The Recent Evolution of Agricultural Trade Policy Reform:
    2. The historical context of the green box Néstor Stancanelli
    3. Doha Round negotiations on the green box, and beyond Jonathan Hepburn and Christophe Bellmann
    4. The reform of the EU's Common Agricultural Policy Alan Swinbank
    5. Farm policy reform in the US: past progress and future direction David Orden
    6. Agricultural trade policy reform in Japan Masayoshi Honma
    Part II. The Focus, Extent and Economic Impact of Green Box Subsidies:
    7. Agricultural support in the green box: an analysis of EU, US and Japanese green box spending Jesús Antón
    8. Green box subsidies and trade-distorting support: is there a cumulative impact? Carlos Galperín and Ivana Doporto Miguez
    9. The distributional structure of green box subsidies in the European Union and France Vincent Chatellier
    10. The distributional structure of US green box subsidies Harry de Gorter
    Part III. Green Box Subsidies and Developing Countries:
    11. Agricultural subsidies in the WTO green box: opportunities and challenges for developing countries André Nassar, Maria Elba Rodriguez-Alcalá and Cinthia C. Costa
    12. Use of green box measures by developing countries: an assessment Biswajit Dhar
    13. A Chinese perspective on the green box Jianmin Xie
    14. African countries and the green box Abena Oduro
    Part IV. Green Box Subsidies and the Environment:
    15. The environmental impact of green box subsidies: exploring the linkages Ron Steenblik and Charles Tsai
    16. The environmental impact of European Union green box subsidies Ariel Brunner and Harry Huyton
    17. The environmental impact of US green box subsidies Jane Earley
    18. Biofuels subsidies and the green box Tim Josling, Freeman Spogli and David Blandford
    Part V. Looking Forward: How Can Change Take Place?:
    19. Improving monitoring and surveillance of green box subsidies Andrea Cerda
    20. Subsidy reform in the EU context: options for achieving change Teresa Cavero
    21. Subsidy reform in the US context: deviating from decoupling Ann Tutwiler
    22. Subsidy reform in Japan: options for achieving change Kazuhito Yamashita
    23. Towards a green box subsidy regime that promotes sustainable development: strategies for achieving change Pedro de Camargo Neto and Renato Henz.

  • Editors

    Ricardo Meléndez-Ortiz, ICTSD, Geneva, Switzerland
    Ricardo Meléndez-Ortiz is co-founder and Chief Executive of the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD). His previous experience encompasses responsibility in a diverse range of capacities at the interface of international trade and sustainable development.

    Christophe Bellmann, ICTSD, Geneva, Switzerland
    Christophe Bellmann is the Programmes Director at the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD). Before joining ICTSD, Mr Bellmann worked with the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), and with the Swiss Coalition of Development Organisations.

    Jonathan Hepburn, ICTSD, Geneva, Switzerland
    Jonathan Hepburn is Programme Officer for Agriculture at the International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD). Before joining ICTSD, he represented Oxfam International to the World Bank and IMF in Washington D.C., and led Oxfam's global campaign on aid, debt and the Millennium Development Goals. Previously, he worked on trade, development and human rights issues with the Quaker United Nations Office, Geneva.

    Contributors

    Christophe Bellmann, Jonathan Hepburn, Néstor Stancanelli, Alan Swinbank, David Orden, Masayoshi Honma, Jesús Antón, Carlos Galperín, Ivana Doporto Miguez, Vincent Chatellier, Harry de Gorter, André Nassar, Maria Elba Rodriguez-Alcalá, Cinthia C. Costa, Biswajit Dhar, Jianmin Xie, Abena Oduro, Ron Steenblik, Charles Tsai, Ariel Brunner, Harry Huyton, Jane Earley, Tim Josling, Freeman Spogli, David Blandford, Andrea Cerda, Teresa Cavero, Ann Tutwiler, Pedro de Camargo Neto, Renato Henz

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email cflack@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that an additional password is required to open the solutions file once you have downloaded it. Contact collegesales@cambridge.org for this password.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website, your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

© Cambridge University Press 2014

Back to top

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel Delete

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×