Skip to content
Cart

Your Cart

×

You have 0 items in your cart.

Register Sign in Wishlist
Great Powers and Outlaw States

Great Powers and Outlaw States
Unequal Sovereigns in the International Legal Order

$64.99 (C)

Award Winner

Part of Cambridge Studies in International and Comparative Law

  • Author:
  • Date Published: May 2004
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521534901

$64.99 (C)
Paperback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback, eBook


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • From the Congress of Vienna to the "war on terrorism", the roles of "great powers and outlaw states" have had a major impact on international relations. Gerry Simpson describes the ways in which an international legal order based on "sovereign equality" has accommodated the great powers and regulated outlaw states since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Simpson also offers a way of understanding recent transformations in the global political order by recalling the lessons of the past--in particular, through the recent violent conflicts in Kosovo and Afghanistan.

    • Relevance to contemporary political crises involving major powers and rogue states
    • A rare historical study of international law
    • Historical and legal analysis of wars in Kosovo and Afghanistan
    Read more

    Awards

    • Winner of ASIL Certificate of Merit for Pre-eminent Contribution to Creative Legal Scholarship
    More

    Reviews & endorsements

    'In this important new volume, Gerry Simpson elegantly demonstrates the relationship between law and politics … Simpson makes an important contribution to both fields … this is an important work that takes our understanding of the politics and law of sovereignty to a new level. It neatly combines theoretical and historical analysis and provides a new set of concepts that are sure to become a key part of the lexicon of sovereignty in both international relations and international law.' Alex J. Bellamy, International Affairs

    'Simpson develops a credible and subtle explanation of the severe difficulties inherent in sovereign equality …' Political Science Quarterly

    'Simpson's aim, to reclaim for legal discussion subjects often appropriated by the political sciences, is an important one. He presents his case with wit and flair, and much of the historical analysis would be of interest to the general reader as well as to international lawyers.' The Cambridge Law Journal

    'Simpsons book challenges some of our most basic notions about international law in the past and present. The concepts of legalised hegemony and anti-pluralism, as well as Simpson's threefold understanding of sovereign equality are the prime tools for any historical study on the international legal order in the past three to four centuries. By focusing on the elements of hierarchy and exclusiveness within the international order, Simpson fills the blank spot on the map of international law and its history. This book can be recommended to all scholars with an interest in the history of international modern law.' Cambridge Studies in International and Comparative Law

    'It is a brilliant work of theory of international law … Simpson's book is an important one. It challenges some of our most basic notions about international law in the past and the present. The concepts of legalised hegemony and anti-pluralism, as well as Simpson's threefold understanding of sovereign equality are prime tools for any historical study on the international legal order in the past three to four centuries. By focusing on the elements of hierarchy and exclusiveness within the international order, Simpson fills in a blank spot on the map of international law and its history. … can be recommended to all scholars with an interest in the history of modern international law.' Journal of the History of International Law

    'The book contains refreshing and sometimes provoking thoughts and it is of interest for students and scholars well beyond the circle of international law.' Journal of Peace Research

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: May 2004
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521534901
    • length: 416 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 24 mm
    • weight: 0.61kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Foreword Professor James Crawford
    Preface
    Acknowledgements
    Part I. Introduction:
    1. Great powers and outlaw states
    Part II. Concepts:
    2. Sovereign equalities
    3. Legalised hierarchies
    Part III. Histories: Great Powers:
    4. Legalised hegemony: Vienna to The Hague 1815–1906
    5. 'Extreme equality': rupture at The Hague 1907
    6. The great powers, sovereign equality and the making of the UN charter: San Francisco 1945
    7. Holy alliances: Verona 1818 and Kosovo 1999
    Part IV. Histories: Outlaw States:
    8. Unequal sovereigns 1815–1839
    9. Peace-loving nations:
    1945
    10. Outlaw states:
    1999
    Part V. Conclusion:
    11. Arguing about Afghanistan: great powers and outlaw states redux
    12. The puzzle of sovereignty.

  • Author

    Gerry Simpson, London School of Economics and Political Science
    Gerry Simpson is a Senior Lecturer in the Law Department at the London School of Economics where he teaches Public International Law and International Criminal Law. He has been a Legal Adviser to the Australian Government on international criminal law and was part of the Australian delegation at the Rome Conference in 1998 to establish an international criminal court. He has also worked for several non-governmental organisations and appears regularly in the media discussing the law of war crimes and the law on the use of force in international law. Previous publications include The Law of War Crimes (1997) with Tim McCormack and The Nature of International Law (2001).

    Awards

    • Winner of ASIL Certificate of Merit for Pre-eminent Contribution to Creative Legal Scholarship
    • Winner of ASIL Certificate of Merit for Pre-eminent Contribution to Creative Legal Scholarship

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×