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Look Inside Diversity in Practice
eBook forthcoming

Diversity in Practice
Race, Gender, and Class in Legal and Professional Careers

$140.00 (C)

Part of Cambridge Studies in Law and Society

Spencer Headworth, Robert L. Nelson, David B. Wilkins, Young-Kyu Kim, Kimberly D. Krawiec, John M. Conley, Lissa L. Broome, Louise Ashley, Laura Empson, Yung-Yi Diana Pan, Carroll Seron, Lisa Webley, Jennifer Tomlinson, Daniel Muzio, Hilary Sommerlad, Liz Duff, Fiona M. Kay, Elizabeth H. Gorman, Juliet R. Aiken, Milton C. Regan, Jr, Forrest Briscoe, Andrew von Nordenflycht, Christopher I. Rider, Adina D. Sterling, David Tan, Meghan Dawe, Ronit Dinovitzer
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  • Date Published: April 2016
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107123656

$ 140.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Expressions of support for diversity are nearly ubiquitous among contemporary law firms and corporations. Organizations back these rhetorical commitments with dedicated diversity staff and various diversity and inclusion initiatives. Yet, the goal of proportionate representation for people of color and women remains unrealized. Members of historically underrepresented groups remain seriously disadvantaged in professional training and work environments that white, upper-class men continue to dominate. While many professional labor markets manifest patterns of demographic inequality, these patterns are particularly pronounced in the law and elite segments of many professions. Diversity in Practice analyzes the disconnect between expressed commitments to diversity and practical achievements, revealing the often obscure systemic causes that drive persistent professional inequalities. These original contributions build on existing literature and forge new paths in explaining enduring patterns of stratification in professional careers. These more realistic assessments provide opportunities to move beyond mere rhetoric to something approaching diversity in practice.

    • Cuts through clichés to reveal the reality of diversity practices in boardrooms, law schools, and service firms
    • The broadest study of diversity in professional careers to date
    • The wide range of data and methods will appeal to quantitative and qualitative social scientists, legal academics, diversity professionals, and students
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    Reviews & endorsements

    '[Headworth, Nelson, Dinovittzer and Wilkins] find that while many professional labor markets manifest patterns of demographic inequality, these patterns are particularly pronounced in the law and elite segments of other professions. Contributors to their volume analyze the disconnect between expressed commitments to diversity and practical achievements, identifying the often obscure systemic causes that drive persistent professional inequalities.' Law and Social Inquiry

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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2016
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107123656
    • length: 454 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 158 x 30 mm
    • weight: 0.79kg
    • contains: 33 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction Spencer Headworth and Robert L. Nelson
    Part I. Rhetoric and Realities:
    2. The action after the call: what general counsels say about the value of diversity in legal purchasing decisions in the years following the 'Call to Action' David B. Wilkins and Young-Kyu Kim
    3. Diversity and talent at the top: lessons from the boardroom Kimberly D. Krawiec, John M. Conley and Lissa L. Broome
    4. Explaining social exclusion and the 'war for talent' in the UK's elite professional service firms Louise Ashley and Laura Empson
    Part II. Entering Professional Careers: Barriers, Ladders, and Basement Doors:
    5. Typecast socialization: race, gender, and competing expectations in law school Yung-Yi Diana Pan
    6. Rethinking the intersectionality of race, gender, and class identity: educating underrepresented minority women for elite careers in science, technology, math, and engineering Carroll Seron
    7. Access to a career in the legal profession in England and Wales: race, class, and the role of educational background Lisa Webley, Jennifer Tomlinson, Daniel Muzio, Hilary Sommerlad and Liz Duff
    8. The new 'professionalism' in England and Wales: talent, diversity, and a legal precariat Hilary Sommerlad
    Part III. Inequality and Opportunity in the Careers of Diverse Attorneys:
    9. Which kinds of law firms have the most minority lawyers? Organizational context and the representation of African-Americans, Latinos, and Asian-Americans Fiona M. Kay and Elizabeth H. Gorman
    10. Gendered pathways: choice, constraint, and women's job movements in the legal profession Juliet R. Aiken and Milton C. Regan, Jr
    11. The effectiveness of inheritance vs rainmaking strategies in building books of business for female and minority partners Forrest Briscoe and Andrew von Nordenflycht
    12. Career mobility and racial diversity in law firms Christopher I. Rider, Adina D. Sterling and David Tan
    13. Immigrant offspring in the legal profession: exploring the effects of immigrant status on earnings among American lawyers Meghan Dawe and Ronit Dinovitzer.

  • Editors

    Spencer Headworth, American Bar Foundation
    Spencer Headworth is Graduate Research Coordinator at the American Bar Foundation and a Ph.D. candidate in Northwestern University's Department of Sociology. He studies crime and social control, law, inequality, organizations, and professions. His dissertation, 'Policing Welfare', examines dedicated welfare fraud control units, a novel intersection between the worlds of public benefits and law enforcement.

    Robert L. Nelson, American Bar Foundation
    Robert L. Nelson is the MacCrate Research Chair in the Legal Profession at the American Bar Foundation and Professor of Sociology and Law at Northwestern University, Illinois. He studies law, inequality, and the legal profession. He is the author of Legalizing Gender Inequality: Courts, Markets, and Unequal Pay for Women in America (with William Bridges, Cambridge, 1999), which won the best book award from the American Sociological Association. From 2004–15, Nelson served as Director of the American Bar Foundation.

    Ronit Dinovitzer, University of Toronto
    Ronit Dinovitzer is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto and is cross-appointed to the Institute for Management and Innovation. Her work focuses on the social structure of the legal profession and on professional ethics. Ronit is a Faculty Fellow of the American Bar Foundation where she is a co-investigator on 'After the JD', the first national longitudinal study of US law graduates, and she has now completed the first national survey of Canadian law graduates.

    David B. Wilkins, Harvard Law School, Massachusetts
    David B. Wilkins is Lester Kissel Professor of Law and Director of the Center on the Legal Profession at Harvard Law School, Massachusetts. He is a globally recognized scholar on the legal profession, having written over eighty articles and coauthored one of the leading casebooks in the field. Professor Wilkins is a Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Corresponding Member of the Spanish Royal Academy of Doctors.

    Contributors

    Spencer Headworth, Robert L. Nelson, David B. Wilkins, Young-Kyu Kim, Kimberly D. Krawiec, John M. Conley, Lissa L. Broome, Louise Ashley, Laura Empson, Yung-Yi Diana Pan, Carroll Seron, Lisa Webley, Jennifer Tomlinson, Daniel Muzio, Hilary Sommerlad, Liz Duff, Fiona M. Kay, Elizabeth H. Gorman, Juliet R. Aiken, Milton C. Regan, Jr, Forrest Briscoe, Andrew von Nordenflycht, Christopher I. Rider, Adina D. Sterling, David Tan, Meghan Dawe, Ronit Dinovitzer

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