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Escaping From Predators
An Integrative View of Escape Decisions

$108.00 (C)

Ron Ydenberg, Larry Dill, William E. Cooper, Jr, Daniel T. Blumstein, Theodore Stankowich, Eigil Reimers, Anders Pape Møller, Patricia A. Fleming, Philip W. Bateman, Paolo Domenici, Graeme D. Ruxton, José Martín, Pilar López, Guy Beauchamp, Kathleen L. Foster, Clint E. Collins, Timothy E. Higham, Theodore Garland, Jr, Luke P. Tyrrell, Esteban Fernández-Juricic, Yoav Litvin, D. Caroline Blanchard, Robert J. Blanchard, Lesley T. Lancaster, Diogo S. M. Samia
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  • Date Published: July 2015
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107060548

$ 108.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • When a predator attacks, prey are faced with a series of 'if', 'when' and 'how' escape decisions – these critical questions are the foci of this book. Cooper and Blumstein bring together a balance of theory and empirical research to summarise over fifty years of scattered research and benchmark current thinking in the rapidly expanding literature on the behavioural ecology of escaping. The book consolidates current and new behaviour models with taxonomically divided empirical chapters that demonstrate the application of escape theory to different groups. The chapters integrate behaviour with physiology, genetics and evolution to lead the reader through the complex decisions faced by prey during a predator attack, examining how these decisions interact with life history and individual variation. The chapter on best practice field methodology and the ideas for future research presented throughout, ensure this volume is practical as well as informative.

    • The first book to present comprehensive findings from the rapidly developing field of escape behaviour, integrating scattered research into a single and accessible resource
    • Features contributions from leading researchers and brings together theory and empirical research to present a comprehensive view of the latest knowledge in the field
    • Integrates behaviour with physiology, genetics and evolution, leading the reader through the complex decisions faced by prey during a predator attack and examining how these decisions interact with life history and individual variation
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    Reviews & endorsements

    'This is essential reading for antipredator buffs.' Tim Caro, The Quarterly Review of Biology

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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2015
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107060548
    • length: 460 pages
    • dimensions: 252 x 182 x 24 mm
    • weight: 1kg
    • contains: 116 b/w illus. 15 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    List of contributors
    Foreword Ron Ydenberg and Larry Dill
    Acknowledgements
    1. Escape behaviour: importance, scope, and variables William E. Cooper, Jr and Daniel T. Blumstein
    2. Theory: models of escape behaviour and refuge use William E. Cooper, Jr
    3. Mammals Theodore Stankowich and Eigil Reimers
    4. Birds Anders Pape Møller
    5. Reptiles William E. Cooper, Jr
    6. Fish and amphibians Patricia A. Fleming and Philip W. Bateman
    7. Invertebrates Philip W. Bateman and Patricia A. Fleming
    8. Prey behaviours during fleeing: escape trajectories, signalling and sensory defences Paolo Domenici and Graeme D. Ruxton
    9. Hiding time in refuge José Martín and Pilar López
    10. Vigilance, alarm calling, pursuit deterrence and predation inspection Guy Beauchamp
    11. Determinants of lizard escape performance: decision, motivation, ability, and opportunity Kathleen L. Foster, Clint E. Collins, Timothy E. Higham and Theodore Garland, Jr
    12. Sensory systems and escape behaviour Luke P. Tyrrell and Esteban Fernández-Juricic
    13. The physiology of escape Yoav Litvin, D. Caroline Blanchard and Robert J. Blanchard
    14. Maternal and genetic effects on escape: a prospective review Lesley T. Lancaster
    15. The personality of escape Pilar López and José Martín
    16. Best practice for the study of escape behaviour Daniel T. Blumstein, Diogo S. M. Samia, Theodore Stankowich and William E. Cooper, Jr
    17. Afterword Daniel T. Blumstein and William E. Cooper, Jr
    Index.

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    Escaping From Predators

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  • Editors

    William E. Cooper, Jr, Indiana University–Purdue University, Indianapolis
    William E. Cooper, Jr is Professor Emeritus of Biology at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne, and a Research Associate in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at University of Arizona. A behavioural ecologist by background, he has over 35 years of teaching and research experience in behaviour, ecology and evolution. He has specialised in escape behaviour for the past 20 years, with particular interest in reptilian behaviour.

    Daniel T. Blumstein, University of California, Los Angeles
    Daniel T. Blumstein is Professor and Chair of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a Professor in UCLA's Institute of Environment and Sustainability. He has studied animal behaviour throughout the world, with research focusing on the evolution of social and antipredator behaviour and the effects that mechanisms of behaviour have on higher-level ecological processes and for wildlife conservation.

    Contributors

    Ron Ydenberg, Larry Dill, William E. Cooper, Jr, Daniel T. Blumstein, Theodore Stankowich, Eigil Reimers, Anders Pape Møller, Patricia A. Fleming, Philip W. Bateman, Paolo Domenici, Graeme D. Ruxton, José Martín, Pilar López, Guy Beauchamp, Kathleen L. Foster, Clint E. Collins, Timothy E. Higham, Theodore Garland, Jr, Luke P. Tyrrell, Esteban Fernández-Juricic, Yoav Litvin, D. Caroline Blanchard, Robert J. Blanchard, Lesley T. Lancaster, Diogo S. M. Samia

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