Skip to content
Open global navigation

Cambridge University Press

AcademicLocation selectorSearch toggleMain navigation toggle
Cart
Register Sign in Wishlist

Neuroscience of Birdsong

$176.00

H. P. Zeigler, Alison Doupe, Pat Kuhl, Heather Williams, Gisela Kaplan, Anton Reiner, David J. Perkel, Claudio V. Mello, Erich D. Jarvis, Michael Farries, David. J. Perkel, Roderick A. Suthers, Sue Ann Zollinger, Franz Goller, Brenton G. Cooper, Marc F. Schmidt, Robin Ashmore, J. Martin Wild, Peter Marler, Frédéric E. Theunissen, Noopur Amin, Sarita Shaevitz, Sarah M. N. Woolley, Thane Fremouw, Mark E. Hauber, J. F. Prather, Richard Mooney, Tim Gentner, Henrike Hultsch, Dietmar Todt, Sigal Saar, Partha P. Mithra, Sebastien Deregnaucourt, Ofer Tchernichovski, Michael S. Brainard, Kathy Nordeen, Ernest Nordeen, Johan J. Bolhuis, Patrice Adret, Cheryl F. Harding, Gregory F. Ball, Lauren V. Riters, Scott A. MacDougall-Shackleton, J. Balthazart, Eliot Brenowitz, Carolyn Pytte, Linda Wilbrecht, John R. Kirn, David F. Clayton, Arthur P. Arnold, Claudio V. Mello, Erich D. Jarvis, Sebastian Haesler, Constance Scharff, R. A. Hinde, M. Konishi, Fernando Nottebohm
View all contributors
  • Date Published: October 2008
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521869157

$176.00
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Paperback


Looking for an examination copy?

This title is not currently available for examination. However, if you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
About the Authors
  • Speech has long been thought of as a uniquely defining characteristic of humans. Yet song birds, like humans, communicate using learned signals (song, speech) that are acquired from their parents by a process of vocal imitation. Both song and speech begin as amorphous vocalizations (subsong, babble) that are gradually transformed into an individualized version of the parents' speech, including dialects. With contributions from both the founding forefathers and younger researchers of this field, this book provides a comprehensive summary of birdsong neurobiology, and identifies the common brain mechanisms underlying this achievement in both birds and humans. Written primarily for advanced graduates and researchers, there is an introductory overview covering song learning, the parallels between language and birdsong and the relationship between the brains of birds and mammals; subsequent sections deal with producing, processing, learning and recognizing song, as well as with hormonal and genomic mechanisms.

    • Broad coverage by leading and upcoming contributors give book impressive depth and scope
    • All major laboratories are represented, including European, Australian and New Zealand extending readership to include an international audience
    • Each part is preceded by an introduction written by the editors to provide the context for the chapters
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: October 2008
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521869157
    • length: 542 pages
    • dimensions: 250 x 192 x 30 mm
    • weight: 1.38kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Foundations: Singing and the Brain:
    1. Introduction H. P. Zeigler
    2. Birdsong and human speech Alison Doupe and Pat Kuhl
    3. Birdsong and singing behavior Heather Williams
    4. The Australian Magpie (Gymnorhina tibicen): an alternative model for the study of songbird neurobiology Gisela Kaplan
    5. Songbirds and the revised avian brain nomenclature Anton Reiner, David J. Perkel, Claudio V. Mello and Erich D. Jarvis
    6. The songbird brain in comparative perspective Michael Farries and David. J. Perkel
    Part II. Song Production and its Neural Control:
    7. Introduction H. P. Zeigler
    8. Mechanisms of song production in songbirds Roderick A. Suthers and Sue Ann Zollinger
    9. Peripheral sensorimotor mechanisms and the control of song Franz Goller and Brenton G. Cooper
    10. Integrating breathing and singing: forebrain and brainstem mechanisms Marc F. Schmidt and Robin Ashmore
    11. Birdsong: anatomical foundations and central mechanisms of sensorimotor integration J. Martin Wild
    Part III. Hearing and Recognizing the Song:
    12. Introduction Peter Marler
    13. Song selectivity and the songbird brain Frédéric E. Theunissen, Noopur Amin, Sarita Shaevitz, Sarah M. N. Woolley, Thane Fremouw and Mark E. Hauber
    14. Song-selective neurons: synaptic mechanisms and functional roles J. F. Prather and Richard Mooney
    15. Temporal auditory pattern recognition in songbirds Tim Gentner
    Part IV. Learning the Song: Mechanisms of Acquisition and Maintenance:
    16. Introduction Peter Marler
    17. Comparative aspects of song learning Henrike Hultsch and Dietmar Todt
    18. Developmental song learning in the zebra finch Sigal Saar, Partha P. Mithra, Sebastien Deregnaucourt and Ofer Tchernichovski
    19. Auditory feedback and singing in adult birds Sarah M. N. Woolley
    20. The anterior forebrain pathway and vocal plasticity Michael S. Brainard
    21. Circuits and cellular mechanisms of sensory acquisition Kathy and Ernest Nordeen
    22. Chasin' the trace: the neural substrate of birdsong memory Johan J. Bolhuis
    23. The template concept - crafting a song replica from memory Patrice Adret
    Part V. Mechanisms of Modulation and Plasticity:
    24. Introduction Peter Marler
    25. Hormonal modulation of singing behavior: methodology and principles of hormone action Cheryl F. Harding
    26. Sex differences in brain and behavior and neuroendocrine control of the motivation to sing Gregory F. Ball, Lauren V. Riters, Scott A. MacDougall-Shackleton and J. Balthazart
    27. Plasticity of the song control system in adult birds Eliot Brenowitz
    28. Regulation and function of neuronal replacement in the avian song system Carolyn Pytte, Linda Wilbrecht and John R. Kirn
    Part VI. The Genomic Revolution and Birdsong Neurobiology:
    29. Introduction H. P. Zeigler
    30. Studies of songbirds in the age of genetics: what to expect from genomic approaches in the next 20 years David F. Clayton and Arthur P. Arnold
    31. Behavior-dependent expression of inducible genes in vocal learning birds Claudio V. Mello and Erich D. Jarvis
    32. Genes for tuning up the vocal brain: FoxP2 in human speech and birdsong Sebastian Haesler and Constance Scharff
    Part VII. On a Personal Note:
    33. Introduction H. P. Zeigler
    34. William Homans Thorpe: a biographical memoir R. A. Hinde
    35. My journey with birdsong M. Konishi
    36. The discovery of replaceable neurons Fernando Nottebohm
    37. The birdsong saga Peter Marler
    Part VIII. Collected References.

  • general resources

    View all resources
    Group Section Name Type Size Sort Order filter vars
    General Resources9781107411579 - Colour plate sectionpdf27408KB0 general resources general resources general resourcesgeneral resources

    These resources are provided free of charge by Cambridge University Press with permission of the author of the corresponding work, but are subject to copyright. You are permitted to view, print and download these resources for your own personal use only, provided any copyright lines on the resources are not removed or altered in any way. Any other use, including but not limited to distribution of the resources in modified form, or via electronic or other media, is strictly prohibited unless you have permission from the author of the corresponding work and provided you give appropriate acknowledgement of the source.

    If you are having problems accessing these resources please email cflack@cambridge.org

  • Editors

    H. Philip Zeigler, Hunter College, City University of New York
    fm.author_biographical_note1

    Peter Marler, University of California, Davis
    fm.author_biographical_note2

    Contributors

    H. P. Zeigler, Alison Doupe, Pat Kuhl, Heather Williams, Gisela Kaplan, Anton Reiner, David J. Perkel, Claudio V. Mello, Erich D. Jarvis, Michael Farries, David. J. Perkel, Roderick A. Suthers, Sue Ann Zollinger, Franz Goller, Brenton G. Cooper, Marc F. Schmidt, Robin Ashmore, J. Martin Wild, Peter Marler, Frédéric E. Theunissen, Noopur Amin, Sarita Shaevitz, Sarah M. N. Woolley, Thane Fremouw, Mark E. Hauber, J. F. Prather, Richard Mooney, Tim Gentner, Henrike Hultsch, Dietmar Todt, Sigal Saar, Partha P. Mithra, Sebastien Deregnaucourt, Ofer Tchernichovski, Michael S. Brainard, Kathy Nordeen, Ernest Nordeen, Johan J. Bolhuis, Patrice Adret, Cheryl F. Harding, Gregory F. Ball, Lauren V. Riters, Scott A. MacDougall-Shackleton, J. Balthazart, Eliot Brenowitz, Carolyn Pytte, Linda Wilbrecht, John R. Kirn, David F. Clayton, Arthur P. Arnold, Claudio V. Mello, Erich D. Jarvis, Sebastian Haesler, Constance Scharff, R. A. Hinde, M. Konishi, Fernando Nottebohm

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website, your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

© Cambridge University Press 2014

Back to top

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel Delete

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×