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Self-Awareness in Animals and Humans
Developmental Perspectives

$119.99

Louis J. Moses, Sue Taylor Parker, Robert W. Mitchell, Maria L. Boccia, Michael Lewis, Gordon G. Gallup, Jr., György Gergley, Juan-Carlos Gómez, Constance Milbrath, John S. Watson, Daniel Hart, Suzanne Fegley, Alison Gopnik, Andrew N. Meltzoff, Karyl B. Swartz, Siân Evans, Deborah Custance, Kim Bard, Sarah T. Boysen, Kirstan M. Bryan, Traci A. Shreyer, Shoji Itakura, Charles W. Hyatt, William D. Hopkins, H. Lyn White Miles, Francine G. P. Patterson, Ronald H. Cohn, Daniel J. Povinelli, Lindsay E. Law, Andrew J. Lock, James R. Anderson, Robert L. Thompson, Susan L. Boatright-Horowitz, Kenneth Marten, Suchi Psarakos, Lori Marino, Diana Reiss, Roger K. R. Thompson, Cynthia L. Contie
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  • Date Published: May 2006
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521025911

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About the Authors
  • Self-Awareness in Animals and Humans, a collection of original articles on self-awareness in monkeys, apes, humans, and other species, focuses on controversies about how to measure self-awareness, which species are capable of self-awareness and which are not, and why. Several chapters focus on the controversial question of whether gorillas, like other great apes and human infants, are capable of mirror self-recognition (MSR) or whether they are anomalously unable to do so. Other chapters focus on whether macaque monkeys are capable of MSR. The focus of the chapters is both comparative and developmental: several contributors explore the value of frameworks from human developmental psychology for comparative studies. This dual focus - comparative and developmental - reflects the interdisciplinary nature of the volume, which brings together biological anthropologists, comparative and developmental psychologists, and cognitive scientists from Japan, France, Spain, Hungary, New Zealand, Scotland and the United States.

    • Coverage of COCO (well-known study of language in apes)
    • Volume is international and interdisciplinary
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    Product details

    • Date Published: May 2006
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521025911
    • length: 464 pages
    • dimensions: 234 x 156 x 24 mm
    • weight: 0.65kg
    • contains: 47 b/w illus. 30 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Foreword, Louis J. Moses
    Acknowledgments
    Part I. Comparative and Developmental Approaches to Self-Awareness:
    1. Expanding dimensions of the self: through the looking glass and beyond Sue Taylor Parker, Robert W. Mitchell and Maria L. Boccia
    2. Myself and me Michael Lewis
    3. Self-recognition: research strategies and experimental design Gordon G. Gallup, Jr.
    4. From self-recognition to theory-of-mind György Gergely
    5. Mutual awareness in primate communication: a Gricean approach Juan Carlos Gómez
    6. Multiplicities of self Robert W. Mitchell
    7. Contributions of imitation and role playing games to the construction of self in primates Sue Taylor Parker and Constance Milbrath
    Part II. The Development of Self in Human Infants and Children:
    8. Detection of self: the perfect algorithm John S. Watson
    9. Social imitation and the emergence of a mental model of self Daniel Hart and Suzanne Fegley
    10. Minds, bodies and persons: young children's understanding of the self and others as reflected in imitation and 'theory of mind' research Alison Gopnik and Andrew N. Meltzoff
    Part III. Self-Awareness in Great Apes:
    11. Social and cognitive factors in chimpanzee and gorilla mirror behavior and self-recognition Karyl B. Swartz and Siân Evans
    12. The comparative and developmental study of self-recognition and imitation: the importance of social factors Deborah Custance and Kim A. Bard
    13. Shadows and mirrors: alternative avenues to the development of self-recognition in chimpanzees Sarah T. Boysen, Kirstan M. Bryan and Traci A. Shreyer
    14. Symbolic representation of possession in a chimpanzee Shoji Itakura
    15. Self-awareness in bonobos and chimpanzees: a comparative perspective Charles W. Hyatt and William D. Hopkins
    16. Me Chantek: the development of self-awareness in a signing orangutan H. Lyn White Miles
    17. Self-recognition and self-awareness in lowland gorillas Francine G. P. Patterson and Ronald H. Cohn
    18. How to create self-recognizing gorillas (but don't try it on macaques) Daniel J. Povinelli
    19. Incipient mirror self-recognition in zoo gorillas and chimpanzees Sue Taylor Parker
    20. Do gorillas recognize themselves on television? Lindsay E. Law and Andrew J. Lock
    Part IV. Mirrors and Monkeys, Dolphins and Pigeons:
    21. The monkey in the mirror: a strange conspecific James R. Anderson
    22. The question of mirror-mediated self-recognition in apes and monkeys: some new results and reservations Robert L. Thompson and Susan L. Boatright-Horowitz
    23. Mirror behavior in macaques Maria L. Boccia
    24. Evidence of self-awareness in the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) Kenneth Marten and Suchi Psarakos
    25. Mirror self-recognition in bottlenose dolphins: implications for comparative study of highly dissimilar species Lori Marino, Diana Reiss and Gordon G. Gallup, Jr.
    26. Further reflections on mirror-usage by pigeons: lessons from Winnie-the-Pooh and Pinocchio too Roger K. R. Thompson and Cynthia L. Contie
    Part V. Epilogue:
    27. Evolving self-awareness Sue Taylor Parker and Robert W. Mitchell
    Indexes.

  • Editors

    Sue Taylor Parker, Sonoma State University, California

    Robert W. Mitchell, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond

    Maria L. Boccia, University of Colorado

    Contributors

    Louis J. Moses, Sue Taylor Parker, Robert W. Mitchell, Maria L. Boccia, Michael Lewis, Gordon G. Gallup, Jr., György Gergley, Juan-Carlos Gómez, Constance Milbrath, John S. Watson, Daniel Hart, Suzanne Fegley, Alison Gopnik, Andrew N. Meltzoff, Karyl B. Swartz, Siân Evans, Deborah Custance, Kim Bard, Sarah T. Boysen, Kirstan M. Bryan, Traci A. Shreyer, Shoji Itakura, Charles W. Hyatt, William D. Hopkins, H. Lyn White Miles, Francine G. P. Patterson, Ronald H. Cohn, Daniel J. Povinelli, Lindsay E. Law, Andrew J. Lock, James R. Anderson, Robert L. Thompson, Susan L. Boatright-Horowitz, Kenneth Marten, Suchi Psarakos, Lori Marino, Diana Reiss, Roger K. R. Thompson, Cynthia L. Contie

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