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Introductory Biomechanics

Introductory Biomechanics
From Cells to Organisms

$105.00 (X)

textbook

Part of Cambridge Texts in Biomedical Engineering

  • Date Published: March 2007
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521841122
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About the Authors
  • Introductory Biomechanics is a new, integrated text written specifically for engineering students. It provides a broad overview of this important branch of the rapidly growing field of bioengineering. A wide selection of topics is presented, ranging from the mechanics of single cells to the dynamics of human movement. No prior biological knowledge is assumed and in each chapter, the relevant anatomy and physiology are first described. The biological system is then analyzed from a mechanical viewpoint by reducing it to its essential elements, using the laws of mechanics and then tying mechanical insights back to biological function. This integrated approach provides students with a deeper understanding of both the mechanics and the biology than from qualitative study alone. The text is supported by a wealth of illustrations, tables and examples, a large selection of suitable problems and hundreds of current references, making it an essential textbook for any biomechanics course. C. Ross Ethier is a professor of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, the Canada Research Chair in Computational Mechanics, and the Director of the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Toronto, with cross-appointment to the Department of Ophthalmology & Vision Sciences. His research focuses on biomechanical factors in glaucoma and blood flow and mass transfer in the large arteries. He has taught biomechanics for over ten years. Craig A. Simmons is the Canada Research Chair in Mechanobiology and an assistant professor of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto, with cross-appointments to the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering and the Faculty of Dentistry. His research interests include cell and tissue biomechanics and cell mechanobiology, particularly as it relates to tissue engineering and heart valve disease.

    • Truly introductory biomechanics text, presenting a wide range of topics from the mechanics of single cells to the dynamics of human movement: all material has been thoroughly class-tested
    • Written specifically for engineers and others with a 'hard science' background, no prior knowledge of anatomy or physiology is assumed, with the necessary biological background presented in each chapter
    • Richly illustrated with over 300 figures including some colour figures to ensure understanding of key points, over 40 tables to provide quick reference summaries of current reference data and over 120 problems
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    Reviews & endorsements

    Ethier and Simmons have crafted a masterful book clearly capable of introducing engineering students of multiple disciplines to the fascinating field of biomechanics. This text should find wide application in providing sufficient background for a fundamental understanding of this important, emerging area. The depth of coverage will serve well as a foundation for further investigation at the upper undergraduate or graduate level. Yet, little prior knowledge of biology is assumed. The topics covered include clinical specialties in which biomechanics has lent to the understanding and improvement of human health, including the cardiovascular, optometry, and musculoskeletal areas. Based on a long-standing course taught to non-bioengineers, the presentation of material is clear and straightforward. Illustrations are of excellent quality and rich in content. This text will inspire many students of traditional engineering areas to think of biomechanics as a fertile discipline worthy of further pursuit. - James E. Moore, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A&M University

    Customer reviews

    18th Nov 2014 by User561019405557

    Well suited to use for fourth year undergraduates and entering graduate students.

    17th Apr 2015 by Toshit

    Book content is very good. Covers almost all aspects to be known in the field to the instructors and students

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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2007
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521841122
    • length: 524 pages
    • dimensions: 256 x 196 x 37 mm
    • weight: 1.29kg
    • contains: 311 b/w illus. 8 colour illus.
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    1. Introduction
    2. Cellular biomechanics
    3. Hemodynamics
    4. The circulatory system
    5. The interstitium
    6. Ocular biomechanics
    7. The respiratory system
    8. Muscles and movement
    9. Skeletal biomechanics
    10. Terrestrial locomotion
    Appendix A. The electrocardiogram
    Index.

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    Introductory Biomechanics

    C. Ross Ethier, Craig A. Simmons

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  • Authors

    C. Ross Ethier, University of Toronto
    C. Ross Ethier is a Professor of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, the Canada Research Chair in Computational Mechanics, and the Director of the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Toronto, with cross-appointment to the Department of Ophthalmology & Vision Sciences. His research focuses on biomechanical factors in glaucoma and blood flow and mass transfer in the large arteries. He has taught biomechanics for over ten years.

    Craig A. Simmons, University of Toronto
    Craig A. Simmons is the Canada Research Chair in Mechanobiology and an assistant professor of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at the University of Toronto, with cross-appointments to the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering and the Faculty of Dentistry. His research interests include cell and tissue biomechanics and cell mechanobiology, particularly as it relates to tissue engineering and heart valve disease.

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