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Measuring Stress in Humans
A Practical Guide for the Field

$67.00 (C)

Part of Cambridge Studies in Biological and Evolutionary Anthropology

Gary D. James, Gillian H. Ice, William Dressler, Daniel Brown, Tessa Pollard, Thomas W. McDade, Sharon R. Williams
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  • Date Published: September 2012
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107407589

$ 67.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • The purpose of this 2006 book is to present non-invasive methods of measuring the biological responses to psychosocial stress in humans, in non-laboratory (field) settings. Following the pathways of Seyle's General Adaptation Syndrome, the text first describes how to assess the psychosocial stressors of everyday life and then outlines how to measure the psychological, behavioral, neurohumeral, physiological and immunological responses to them. The book concludes with practical information on assessing special populations, analyzing the often-complicated data that are collected in field stress studies and the ethical treatment of human subjects in stress studies. It is intended to be a practical guide for developing and conducting psychophysiological stress research in human biology. This book will assist students and professionals in designing field studies of stress.

    • Provides a basic overview of all currently used measures of stress in humans
    • Provides detailed information on how to implement each method and how to subsequently analyse the data
    • Provides readers with advice on how human studies need to be adjusted for different age groups and populations
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "A textbook that will aid students and professionals in designing field studies of stress...The book's contributors all consider stress a dynamic process."
    Rachel Coker, INSIDE BU

    "The scope of Measuring Stress in Humans: A Practical Guide for the Field is impressive. Editors Gillian H. Ice and Gary D. James have put together a comprehensive intellectual blend of works that discuss stress theoretically and practically in nonlaboratory (field) settings. For beginner stress researchers, this practical guide can be used to understand the many different ways that stress can be measured, gather relevant references to support areas of inquiry, access resource lists, and incorporate recommended guidelines for overall study design. For experienced stress researchers, this practical guide could be used to understand the latest research trends, uncover missing research gaps, identify alternative research methodologies to test research hypotheses, and to recognize new and advanced techniques for data analysis.
    Thomas J. Mernar, University of Southern California
    American Journal of Human Biology

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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2012
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107407589
    • length: 284 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 15 mm
    • weight: 0.38kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Foreword
    Part I. General Principles:
    1. Conducting a field study of stress: general principles Gary D. James and Gillian H. Ice
    Part II. Measuring Stress Responses:
    2. Cultural fimensions of the dtress process: measurement issues in fieldwork William Dressler
    3. Measuring the emotional and behavioral response to stressors Gillian H. Ice
    4. Measuring hormonal variation in the sympathetic adrenal medullary system: catecholamines Daniel Brown
    5. Measuring hormonal variation in the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis (HPA): cortisol Tessa Pollard and Gillian H. Ice
    6. Measuring physiological changes in the cardiovascular system: ambulatory blood pressure Gary D James
    7. Measuring immunological markers Thomas W. McDade
    Part III. Practical Issues in Studying Stress:
    8. Special populations Sharon R. Williams
    9. Study design and data analysis Gary D. James and Gillian H. Ice
    10. Ethics in human subjects research Gary D. James and Gillian H. Ice
    11. Epilogue: summary and future directions Gary D. James and Gillian H. Ice.

  • Editors

    Gillian H. Ice, Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine

    Gary D. James, State University of New York, Binghamton

    Contributors

    Gary D. James, Gillian H. Ice, William Dressler, Daniel Brown, Tessa Pollard, Thomas W. McDade, Sharon R. Williams

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