Skip to content
Cart

Your Cart

×

You have 0 items in your cart.

Register Sign in Wishlist
Conservation of Exploited Species

Conservation of Exploited Species

$93.00 (P)

Part of Conservation Biology

Sir Robert May, Georgina M. Mace, John D. Reynolds, Donald Ludwig, André E. Punt, Anthony D. M. Smith, Russell Lande, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Steinar Engen, E. J. Milner-Gulland, Paul R. Wade, Simon Jennings, Nicholas K. Dulvy, Andy Purvis, Steven R. Beissinger, John E. Fa, Carlos A. Peres, Charles M. Peters, William J. Sutherland, Jennifer A. Gill, Christopher W. Petersen, Don R. Levitan, Hanna Kokko, Jan Lindström, Esa Ranta, Richard Law, Michel J. Kaiser, Kent H. Redford, Peter Feinsinger, Gordon C. Grigg, Anthony R. Pople, Anne Gunn, Jon Hutton, Barney Dickson, Steven Sanderson, John G. Robinson
View all contributors
  • Date Published: November 2001
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521787338

$ 93.00 (P)
Paperback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Hardback


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • This book brings together international experts to examine interactions between the biology of wildlife and the divergent goals of people involved in hunting, fishing, gathering, and culling wildlife. Reviews of theory show how sustainable exploitation is tied to the study of population dynamics, with direct links to reproductive rates, life histories, behavior, and ecology. As such theory is rarely put into practice to achieve sustainable use and effective conservation, Conservation of Exploited Species explores the many reasons for this failure and considers remedies to tackle them.

    • Covers basic ecological principles to new theoretical advances
    • Explores diverse viewpoints in a controversial subject
    • Contains contributions from leading international experts and a foreword by Sir Robert May, President of The Royal Society and former Chief Scientific Advisor to the UK Government
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "Conservation of Exploited Species is sure to become a landmark in the sometimes-quixotic search for sustainable ways of exploiting nature." Biodiversity

    "Well written..." Natural Areas Journal

    "...this book [is] a very useful resource on the topic of sustainable use and the problems of determining a maximum sustainable yield for exploited species....Introductory and concluding essays by the editors provide some synthesis to the divergent viewpoints presented in the articles," Choice

    "...this is an important book and can be considered required reading for conservation biologists and highly recommended for applied ecologists and biological managers. It also covers enough socio-political and economic issues that many others...will find it informative. This book is a valuable edition to conservation policy studies..." Ecology

    "Appropriate for advanced undergraduates. An essential reference for researchers involved in conservation biology." Northeastern Naturalist

    "Even though this book is meant for biology students, it has much to interest anyone working in wildlife conservation." The Canadian Field-Naturalist much to interest

    "Very informative." Canadian Society of Environmental Biologists

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: November 2001
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521787338
    • length: 548 pages
    • copublisher: The Zoological Society of London
    • dimensions: 234 x 156 x 28 mm
    • weight: 0.76kg
    • contains: 68 b/w illus. 31 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    List of contributors
    Foreword Sir Robert May
    Part I. Setting the Scene:
    1. Exploitation as a conservation issue Georgina M. Mace and John D. Reynolds
    2. Can we exploit sustainably? Donald Ludwig
    Part II. Population-Based Approaches:
    3. The gospel of maximum sustainable yield in fisheries management: birth, crucifixion and reincarnation André E. Punt and Anthony D. M. Smith
    4. Sustainable exploitation of fluctuating populations Russell Lande, Bernt-Erik Sæther and Steinar Engen
    5. The exploitation of spatially structured populations E. J. Milner-Gulland
    6. The conservation of exploited species in an uncertain world: novel methods and the failure of traditional techniques Paul R. Wade
    Part III. Taxonomic Comparisons:
    7. Life histories of fishes and population responses to exploitation John D. Reynolds, Simon Jennings and Nicholas K. Dulvy
    8. Mammalian life histories and responses of populations to exploitation Andy Purvis
    9. Trade of live wild birds: potentials, principles, and practices of sustainable use Steven R. Beissinger
    10. Game vertebrate extraction in African and Neotropical forests: an intercontinental comparison John E. Fa and Carlos A. Peres
    11. Lessons from the plant kingdom for conservation of exploited species Charles M. Peters
    Part IV. From Individuals to Communities:
    12. The role of behaviour in studying sustainable exploitation William J. Sutherland and Jennifer A. Gill
    13. The Allee effect: a barrier to recovery by exploited species Christopher W. Petersen and Don R. Levitan
    14. Life histories and sustainable harvesting Hanna Kokko, Jan Lindström and Esa Ranta
    15. Phenotypic and genetic changes due to selective exploitation Richard Law
    16. An ecosystem perspective on conserving targeted and non-targeted species Michel J. Kaiser and Simon Jennings
    17. The half-empty forest: sustainable use and the ecology of interactions Kent H. Redford and Peter Feinsinger
    Part V. Conservation Meets Sustainable Use:
    18. Sustainable use and pest control in conservation: kangaroos as a case study Gordon C. Grigg and Anthony R. Pople
    19. Conservation and resource use in arctic ecosytems Anne Gunn
    20. Conservation out of exploitation: a silk purse from a sow's ear? Jon Hutton and Barney Dickson
    21. Getting the biology right in a political sort of way Steven Sanderson
    Part VI. Final Thoughts:
    22. Using 'sustainable use' approaches to conserve exploited populations John G. Robinson
    Index.

  • Editors

    John D. Reynolds, University of East Anglia
    John Reynolds is a Reader in Evolutionary Ecology at the University of East Anglia, England. His research focuses on the evolution of reproductive behaviour and life histories with an emphasis on implications for conservation of marine and freshwater fishes. He was awarded the FSBI medal of the Fisheries Society of the British Isles in 2000, and is co-author of Marine Fisheries Ecology (2001) and co-editor of The Fish and Fisheries Handbook (2002).

    Georgina M. Mace, Institute of Zoology, London
    Georgina Mace is the Director of Science at the Institute of Zoology, London. Her research concerns extinction risk assessment and she has had extensive involvement with the IUCN in developing systems for categorising the levels of threat used in Red Lists of threatened species. She was awarded the Order of the British Empire in 1998. She is co-editor of Creative Conservation (1994) and Conservation in a Changing World (Cambridge, 1999).

    Kent H. Redford, Wildlife Conservation Society, New York
    Kent Redford is Director of Biodiversity Analysis at the Wildlife Conservation Society, New York. His research interests focus on effects of human use on biodiversity conservation, parks and protected areas and wildlife use by indigenous peoples. He has also co-edited Neotropical Wildlife Use and Conservation (1991), Conservation of Neotropical Forests (1992) and Parks in Peril (1998).

    John G. Robinson, Wildlife Conservation Society, New York
    John G. Robinson is Senior Vice-President and Director of International Conservation at the Wildlife Conservation Society, New York. His research examines impacts of hunting on wildlife, particularly in tropical forests. He has worked on the IUCN's Sustainable Use Initiative and has has co-edited Neotropical Wildlife Use and Conservation (1991) and Hunting for Sustainability in Tropical Forests (2000).

    Contributors

    Sir Robert May, Georgina M. Mace, John D. Reynolds, Donald Ludwig, André E. Punt, Anthony D. M. Smith, Russell Lande, Bernt-Erik Sæther, Steinar Engen, E. J. Milner-Gulland, Paul R. Wade, Simon Jennings, Nicholas K. Dulvy, Andy Purvis, Steven R. Beissinger, John E. Fa, Carlos A. Peres, Charles M. Peters, William J. Sutherland, Jennifer A. Gill, Christopher W. Petersen, Don R. Levitan, Hanna Kokko, Jan Lindström, Esa Ranta, Richard Law, Michel J. Kaiser, Kent H. Redford, Peter Feinsinger, Gordon C. Grigg, Anthony R. Pople, Anne Gunn, Jon Hutton, Barney Dickson, Steven Sanderson, John G. Robinson

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×