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Phylogeny and Conservation

$84.00

Part of Conservation Biology

Andy Purvis, John L. Gittleman, Thomas M. Brooks, Elizabeth A. Sinclair, Marcos Pérez-Losada, Keith A. Crandall, Paul-Michael Agapow, John C. Avise, Ana S. L. Rodrigues, Thomas M. Brooks, Kevin J. Gaston, Arne Ø. Mooers, Stephen B. Heard, E. Chrostowski, Kate E. Jones, Wes Sechrest, John L. Gittleman, Thomas B. Smith, Sassan Saatchi, Catherine Graham, Hans Slabbekoorn, Greg Spicer, Jon C. Lovett, Rob Marchant, James Taplin, Wolfgang Küper, Guy F. Midgley, Gail Reeves, C. Klak, Craig Moritz, Conrad Hoskin, Catherine H. Graham, Andrew Hugall, Adnan Moussalli, J. D. Pilgrim, Gustavo A. B. da Fonseca, Marcel Cardillo, Richard Grenyer, Ben Collen, Peter M. Bennett, Ian P. F. Owens, Daniel Nussey, Stephen T. Garnett, Gabriel M. Crowley, José M. Cardoso da Silva, Anthony B. Rylands, José S. Silva Júnior, Claude Gascon, Julie Lockwood, Sean Nee, Timothy G. Barraclough, T. Jonathan Davies
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  • Date Published: October 2005
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521532006

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About the Authors
  • Phylogeny is a potentially powerful tool for conserving biodiversity. This book explores how it can be used to tackle questions of great practical importance and urgency for conservation. Using case studies from many different taxa and regions of the world, the volume evaluates how useful phylogeny is in understanding the processes that have generated today's diversity and the processes that now threaten it. The urgency with which conservation decisions have to be made as well as the need for the best possible decisions make this volume of great value to researchers, practitioners and policy-makers.

    • The first synthesis to explore the ways in which phylogeny can influence conservation biology and policy
    • Explores both the conservation of present-day diversity, and the processes that have generated it
    • Features case studies from a wide range of taxonomic groups, scales and geographical regions
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "This book should be examined by all concerned with conserving biodiversity."
    Ecology, Ross H. Crozier

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    Product details

    • Date Published: October 2005
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521532006
    • length: 448 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 25 mm
    • weight: 0.65kg
    • contains: 33 b/w illus. 2 colour illus. 30 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Phylogeny and conservation Andy Purvis, John L. Gittleman and Thomas M. Brooks
    Part I. Units and Currencies:
    2. Molecular phylogenetics for conservation biology Elizabeth A. Sinclair, Marcos Pérez-Losada and Keith A. Crandall
    3. Species: demarcation and diversity Paul-Michael Agapow, 4. Phylogenetic units and currencies above and below the species level John C. Avise
    5. Integrating phylogenetic diversity in the selection of priority areas for conservation: does it make a difference? Ana S. L. Rodrigues, Thomas M. Brooks and Kevin J. Gaston
    6. Evolutionary heritage as a metric for conservation Arne Ø. Mooers, Stephen B. Heard and E. Chrostowski
    Part II. Inferring Evolutionary Processes:
    7. Age and area revisited: identifying global patterns and implications for conservation Kate E. Jones, Wes Sechrest and John L. Gittleman
    8. Putting process on the map: why ecotones are important for preserving biodiversity Thomas B. Smith, Sassan Saatchi, Catherine Graham, Hans Slabbekoorn and Greg Spicer
    9. The oldest rainforests in Africa: stability or resilience for survival and diversity? Jon C. Lovett, Rob Marchant, James Taplin and Wolfgang Küper
    10. Late Tertiary and Quaternary climate change and centres of endemism in the southern African flora Guy F. Midgley, Gail Reeves and C. Klak
    11. Historical biogeography, diversity and conservation of Australia's tropical rainforest herpetofauna Craig Moritz, Conrad Hoskin, Catherine H. Graham, Andrew Hugall and Adnan Moussalli
    Part III. Effects of Human Processes:
    12. Conservation status and geographic distribution of avian evolutionary history Thomas M. Brooks, J. D. Pilgrim, Ana S. L. Rodrigues and Gustavo A. B. da Fonseca
    13. Correlates of extinction risk: phylogeny, biology, threat and scale Andy Purvis, Marcel Cardillo, Richard Grenyer and Ben Collen
    14. Mechanisms of extinction in birds: phylogeny, ecology and threats Peter M. Bennett, Ian P. F. Owens, Daniel Nussey, Stephen T. Garnett and Gabriel M. Crowley
    15. Primate diversity patterns and their conservation in Amazonia José M. Cardoso da Silva, Anthony B. Rylands, José S. Silva Júnior, Claude Gascon and Gustavo A. B. da Fonseca
    16. Predicting which species will become invasive: what's taxonomy got to do with it? Julie Lockwood
    Part IV. Prognosis:
    17. Phylogenetic futures after the latest mass extinction Sean Nee
    18. Predicting future speciation Timothy G. Barraclough and T. Jonathan Davies.

  • Resources for

    Phylogeny and Conservation

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  • Editors

    Andrew Purvis, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London
    ANDY PURVIS is Reader in Biodiversity at Imperial College London. His research interests include phylogenetics, macroevolution and conservation biology, and his current research focuses on using phylogenies to study macroevolution and extinction.

    John L. Gittleman, University of Virginia
    JOHN GITTLEMAN is Professor of Biology at the University of Virginia. He is the author of many scientific papers and several books, including Carnivore Conservation (2001, ISBN 0 521 66232 X). His current research examines global patterns and processes of speciation and extinction in mammals.

    Thomas Brooks, Conservation International, Washington DC
    THOMAS BROOKS is head of the Conservation Synthesis Department in Conservation International's Center for Applied Biodiversity Science. His interests lie in species conservation, particularly birds, and tropical forest hotspots.

    Contributors

    Andy Purvis, John L. Gittleman, Thomas M. Brooks, Elizabeth A. Sinclair, Marcos Pérez-Losada, Keith A. Crandall, Paul-Michael Agapow, John C. Avise, Ana S. L. Rodrigues, Thomas M. Brooks, Kevin J. Gaston, Arne Ø. Mooers, Stephen B. Heard, E. Chrostowski, Kate E. Jones, Wes Sechrest, John L. Gittleman, Thomas B. Smith, Sassan Saatchi, Catherine Graham, Hans Slabbekoorn, Greg Spicer, Jon C. Lovett, Rob Marchant, James Taplin, Wolfgang Küper, Guy F. Midgley, Gail Reeves, C. Klak, Craig Moritz, Conrad Hoskin, Catherine H. Graham, Andrew Hugall, Adnan Moussalli, J. D. Pilgrim, Gustavo A. B. da Fonseca, Marcel Cardillo, Richard Grenyer, Ben Collen, Peter M. Bennett, Ian P. F. Owens, Daniel Nussey, Stephen T. Garnett, Gabriel M. Crowley, José M. Cardoso da Silva, Anthony B. Rylands, José S. Silva Júnior, Claude Gascon, Julie Lockwood, Sean Nee, Timothy G. Barraclough, T. Jonathan Davies

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