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Oil in the Environment
Legacies and Lessons of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill

$48.00

David K. Johnson, Laura R. Rustin, John A. Wiens, Paul D. Boehm, Erich R. Gundlach, David S. Page, Jerry M. Neff, Edward H. Owens, P. Douglas Reimer, Chris B. Wooley, James C. Haggarty, John S. Brown, Gary A. Pope, Kimberly D. Gordon, James R. Bragg, Ronald M. Atlas, James T. Oris, Aaron P. Roberts, Keith R. Parker, Robert H. Day, Stephen M. Murphy, Ernest L. Brannon, Matthew A. Cronin, Al W. Maki, Larry L. Moulton, Walter H. Pearson, Ralph A. Elston, Karen Humphrey, Richard B. Deriso, David L. Garshelis, Charles B. Johnson, Mark A. Harwell, John H. Gentile
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  • Date Published: August 2013
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107614697

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About the Authors
  • What light does nearly 25 years of scientific study of the Exxon Valdez oil spill shed on the fate and effects of a spill? How can the results help in assessing future spills? How can ecological risks be assessed and quantified? In this, the first book on the effects of Exxon Valdez in 15 years, scientists directly involved in studying the spill provide a comprehensive perspective on, and synthesis of, scientific information on long-term spill effects. The coverage is multidisciplinary, with chapters discussing a range of issues including effects on biota, successes and failures of post-spill studies and techniques, and areas of continued disagreement. An even-handed and critical examination of more than two decades of scientific study, this is an invaluable guide for studying future oil spills and, more broadly, for unraveling the consequences of any large environmental disruption. For access to a full bibliography of related publications, follow the Resources link at www.cambridge.org/9781107027176.

    • The first book to be published on the effects of Exxon Valdez in 15 years, reviewing the effects and recovery at around 25 years post-spill for the most studied oil spill in North American history
    • Written by scientists directly involved in studying the spill, giving readers the benefit of 20+ years of hands-on experience
    • An even-handed, critical examination of opposing viewpoints on controversial issues, providing guidance on how science may best be deployed to understand and deal with future oil spills as well as other forms of environmental disruption
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "It is now 24 years since approximately 34,500 tonnes of crude oil were released into Prince William Sound, Alaska, as a result of the grounding of the tanker Exxon Valdez on Bligh Reef. This oil spill has been described as the most intensively studied in history - over 800 peer-reviewed scientific papers have been produced to date and work is ongoing. This volume, written by scientists who conducted many of these scientific studies, provides an excellent compilation and critical evaluation of the evidence gathered in relation to impacts which occurred as a result of the incident. The additional perspective given by time has also allowed a very useful series of “Lessons learned” following each of the main topic areas to be included. I can recommend this volume to anyone involved in studies undertaken to assess impacts of oil and/or chemical spills, and to others interested in this area of research."
    Robin Law, Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, UK

    "While the full story of any large oil spill may take decades to play, this book provides a holistic view of possible ecosystem effects and describes the evidence to change as a result of the Exxon Valdez oil spill. It is comprehensive in approach but accessible in style – each chapter both fits within the context of the spill ‘life cycle’ but stands alone. The narrative is accessible to the non-expert and is supported by well laid out tables and figures. Oh - that this would have been available in 2010 as oil flowed into the Gulf of Mexico! No two spills are the same but there is a lot to be learned from one that can be applied to others – both for interested bystanders and experts. This book does an excellent job of capturing and conveying the essentials, laying out lessons learned, and supporting the information with citation and illustration."
    Denise Reed, The Water Institute of the Gulf, USA

    "A carefully written book on the iconic 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Given its breadth and authority, the book will likely become a classic in oil spill literature. It is very well organized, covering in sequence topics from oil chemistry to effects on shoreline biota, fish, seabirds and marine mammals. All chapters are written by preeminent specialists who have studied this spill and others for decades. I highly recommend the book to environmental scientists, regulatory and industry personnel, and spill response specialists. Anyone interested in understanding how oil interacts with marine ecosystems and how such systems recover or not from such perturbations will benefit from this book. It is particularly timely given the needs of the scientific community responding to the 2010 Macondo well (Deepwater Horizon) blowout in the Gulf of Mexico. The contributing authors should be congratulated for their outstanding scientific effort and scholarship."
    Peter G. Wells, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada; and Environment Canada (ret.)

    "For those wanting to get a feel for the detail and breadth of the studies following the Exxon Valdez spill this book provides not only a detailed summary on all aspects of the fate and effects, but also an excellent signpost to the primary research carried out. ITOPF echoes the call made in the concluding section of the book for open and transparent science to be carried out at oil spills."
    ITOPF

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    Product details

    • Date Published: August 2013
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107614697
    • length: 482 pages
    • dimensions: 246 x 189 x 23 mm
    • weight: 1.04kg
    • contains: 4 b/w illus. 101 colour illus. 12 maps 27 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    List of contributors
    Prologue
    Acknowledgments
    A bibliographic note David K. Johnson and Laura R. Rustin
    List of acronyms
    Part I. Introduction and Background:
    1. Introduction and background John A. Wiens
    2. The phases of an oil spill and scientific studies of spill effects Paul D. Boehm, Erich R. Gundlach and David S. Page
    Part II. Oil in the Environment:
    3. Oil in the water column Paul D. Boehm, Jerry M. Neff and David S. Page
    4. Surveying oil on the shoreline Edward H. Owens and P. Douglas Reimer
    5. Ancient sites and emergency response: cultural resource protection Chris B. Wooley and James C. Haggarty
    6. Fate of oil on shorelines David S. Page, Paul D. Boehm, John S. Brown, Erich R. Gundlach and Jerry M. Neff
    7. Understanding subsurface contamination using conceptual and mathematical models Gary A. Pope, Kimberly D. Gordon and James R. Bragg
    8. Removal of oil from shorelines: biodegradation and bioremediation Ronald M. Atlas and James R. Bragg
    Part III. Biological Effects:
    9. Cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) as a biomarker in oil spill assessments James T. Oris and Aaron P. Roberts
    10. Assessing effects and recovery from environmental accidents Keith R. Parker, John A. Wiens, Robert H. Day and Stephen M. Murphy
    11. Shoreline biota Erich R. Gundlach, David S. Page, Jerry M. Neff and Paul D. Boehm
    12. Oiling effects on pink salmon Ernest L. Brannon, Matthew A. Cronin, Al W. Maki, Larry L. Moulton and Keith R. Parker
    13. Pacific herring Walter H. Pearson, Ralph A. Elston, Karen Humphrey and Richard B. Deriso
    14. Oil and marine birds in a variable environment John A. Wiens, Robert H. Day and Stephen M. Murphy
    15. Sea otters: trying to see the forest for the trees since Exxon Valdez David L. Garshelis and Charles B. Johnson
    Part IV. Assessing Oil Spill Effects and Ecological Recovery:
    16. Characterizing ecological risks, significance, and recovery Mark A. Harwell, John H. Gentile and Keith R. Parker
    Part V. Conclusions:
    17. Science and oil spills: the broad picture John A. Wiens
    Index.

  • general resources

    View all resources
    Group Section Name Type Size Sort Order filter vars
    General ResourcesBibliographyBibliography for Oil in the Environment - Legacies and Lessons of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spillpdf1992KB0bibliography general resources bibliography general resourcesbibliography

    These resources are provided free of charge by Cambridge University Press with permission of the author of the corresponding work, but are subject to copyright. You are permitted to view, print and download these resources for your own personal use only, provided any copyright lines on the resources are not removed or altered in any way. Any other use, including but not limited to distribution of the resources in modified form, or via electronic or other media, is strictly prohibited unless you have permission from the author of the corresponding work and provided you give appropriate acknowledgement of the source.

    If you are having problems accessing these resources please email cflack@cambridge.org

  • Editor

    John A. Wiens, PRBO Conservation Science, California, and University of Western Australia, Perth
    John A. Wiens is Chief Scientist at PRBO Conservation Science in California, USA, and Winthrop Research Professor in the School of Plant Biology at the University of Western Australia. He has served on the faculties of Oregon State University, the University of New Mexico and Colorado State University, where he was a University Distinguished Professor. From 2002 to 2008 he was Lead Scientist with The Nature Conservancy. His work emphasizes landscape ecology, conservation and the ecology of birds.

    Contributors

    David K. Johnson, Laura R. Rustin, John A. Wiens, Paul D. Boehm, Erich R. Gundlach, David S. Page, Jerry M. Neff, Edward H. Owens, P. Douglas Reimer, Chris B. Wooley, James C. Haggarty, John S. Brown, Gary A. Pope, Kimberly D. Gordon, James R. Bragg, Ronald M. Atlas, James T. Oris, Aaron P. Roberts, Keith R. Parker, Robert H. Day, Stephen M. Murphy, Ernest L. Brannon, Matthew A. Cronin, Al W. Maki, Larry L. Moulton, Walter H. Pearson, Ralph A. Elston, Karen Humphrey, Richard B. Deriso, David L. Garshelis, Charles B. Johnson, Mark A. Harwell, John H. Gentile

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