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Evolutionary Anatomy of the Primate Cerebral Cortex

Evolutionary Anatomy of the Primate Cerebral Cortex

$160.00 (C)

Stephen J. Gould, Kathleen Gibson, Peter M. Kaskan, Barbara L. Finlay, Pasko Rakic, David R. Kornack, Leslie C. Aiello, Nicola Bates, Tracey Joffe, Duane Rumbaugh, Michael Beran, Dean Falk, Michel A. Hofman, Todd M. Preuss, Ralph L. Holloway, Douglas C. Broadfield , Michael S. Yuan, Emmanuel Gilissen, Patrick J. Gannon, Nancy M. Kheck, Patrick R. Hof, Phillip V. Tobias, Katerina Semendeferi, Katrin Schafer, Horst Seidler, Fred L. Bookstein, Hermann Prossinger, Glenn Conroy, Harry Jerison
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  • Date Published: April 2001
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521642712

$ 160.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Studies of brain evolution have moved rapidly in recent years, building on the pioneering research of Harry J. Jerison. This book provides state-of-the-art reviews of primate (including human) brain evolution. The volume is divided into two sections, the first offers new perspectives on the developmental, physiological, dietary, and behavioral correlates of brain enlargement. However, it has long been recognized that brains do not merely enlarge globally as they evolve, but that their cortical and internal organization also changes in a process known as reorganization. Species-specific adaptations therefore have neurological substrates that depend on more than just overall brain size. The second section explores these neurological underpinnings for the senses, adaptations, and cognitive abilities that are important for primates. With a prologue by Stephen J. Gould and an epilogue by Harry J. Jerison, this is an important new reference work for all those working on primate brain evolution.

    • Written by leaders in the field, with a prologue by Stephen J. Gould, and an epilogue summarizing the field by Harry J. Jerison
    • Includes research on both the evolution of brain size and that of internal organization
    • Contains cutting-edge applications of medical imaging technology, and looks to the future for ongoing brain evolution in humans
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "...a good deal of the book's contents will be familiar to the expert reader...an excellent choice for anyone who needs a survey of current evolutionary brain research." Current Anthropolgy

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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2001
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521642712
    • length: 364 pages
    • dimensions: 234 x 156 x 21 mm
    • weight: 0.69kg
    • contains: 70 b/w illus. 9 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    Prologue Stephen J. Gould
    Introduction to Part I Kathleen Gibson
    Part I. The Evolution of Brain Size:
    1. Encephalization and its developmental structure: how many ways can a brain get big? Peter M. Kaskan and Barbara L. Finlay
    2. Neocortical expansion and elaboration during primate evolution: a view from neuroembryology Pasko Rakic and David R. Kornack
    3. In defense of the expensive tissue hypothesis Leslie C. Aiello, Nicola Bates and Tracey Joffe
    4. Bigger is better: primate brain size in relationship to cognition Kathleen Gibson, Duane Rumbaugh and Michael Beran
    5. The evolution of sex differences in primate brains Dean Falk
    6. Brain evolution in hominids: are we at the end of the road? Michel A. Hofman
    Introduction to Part II Dean Falk
    Part II. Neurological Substrates of Species-Specific Adaptations:
    7. The discovery of cerebral diversity: an unwelcome scientific revolution Todd M. Preuss
    8. Pheromonal communication and socialization Brunetto Chiarelli
    9. Revisiting australopithecine visual striate cortex: newer data from chimpanzee and human brains suggest it could have been reduced during australopithecine times Ralph L. Holloway, Douglas C. Broadfield and Michael S. Yuan
    10. Structural symmetries and asymmetries in human and chimpanzee brains Emmanuel Gilissen
    11. Language areas of the hominid brain: a dynamic communicative shift on the upper east side planum Patrick J. Gannon, Nancy M. Kheck and Patrick R. Hof
    12. The promise and the peril in hominid brain evolution Phillip V. Tobias
    13. Advances in the study of hominid brain evolution: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3-D reconstruction Katerina Semendeferi
    14. Exo- and endocranial morphometrics in mid-Pleistocene and modern humans Katrin Schafer, Horst Seidler, Fred L. Bookstein, Hermann Prossinger, Dean Falk and Glenn Conroy
    Epilogue: the study of primate brain evolution: where do we go from here? Harry Jerison.

  • Editors

    Dean Falk, Florida State University

    Kathleen R. Gibson, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston

    Contributors

    Stephen J. Gould, Kathleen Gibson, Peter M. Kaskan, Barbara L. Finlay, Pasko Rakic, David R. Kornack, Leslie C. Aiello, Nicola Bates, Tracey Joffe, Duane Rumbaugh, Michael Beran, Dean Falk, Michel A. Hofman, Todd M. Preuss, Ralph L. Holloway, Douglas C. Broadfield , Michael S. Yuan, Emmanuel Gilissen, Patrick J. Gannon, Nancy M. Kheck, Patrick R. Hof, Phillip V. Tobias, Katerina Semendeferi, Katrin Schafer, Horst Seidler, Fred L. Bookstein, Hermann Prossinger, Glenn Conroy, Harry Jerison

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