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Mammalian Social Learning
Comparative and Ecological Perspectives

$93.00

Part of Symposia of the Zoological Society of London

Hilary O. Box, Kathleen R. Gibson, Thelma Rowell, Barbara J. King, Richard M. Sibly, Karen Higginbottom, David B. Croft, Phyllis C. Lee, Cynthia J. Moss, David R. Klein, Robyn Hudson, Benoist Schaal, Ágnes Bilkó, Donald M. Broom, Kevin N. Laland, Gerald S. Wilkinson, Janette Wenrick Bauman, Chris G. Faulkes, Barrie K. Gilbert, Andrew C. Kitchener, Jan A. J. Nel, James R. Boran, Sara L. Heimlich, Vincent M. Janik, Richard W. Byrne, Stephan J. Shennan, James Steele, Steven Mithen
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  • Date Published: November 2006
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521031950

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About the Authors
  • Social learning commonly refers to the social transfer of information and skill among individuals. It encompasses a wide range of behaviors that include where and how to obtain food, how to interact with members of one's own social group, and how to identify and respond appropriately to predators. Mammalian Social Learning discusses a wide diversity of species, some of which have never been discussed in this context before, with particular reference made to their natural life strategies. Expert chapters consider social learning in humans in comparison with other mammals, especially in their technological and craft traditions. Moreover, for the first time, attention is given to the social learning abilities of prehistoric hominids.

    • Provides a source of information and new perspectives on a developing subject
    • Includes material on social learning in marsupials and Stone Age humans
    • A vast range of mammalian species covered, with particular emphasis placed on field study work
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "This useful volume should give impetus to studies of social learning in mammals both large and small." Bulletin of the Canadian Society of Zoologists

    "Many of thie field studies represnt good old-fashioned, detailed and scholarly naturalism, and finish with predictions of the effect of distinctive ecologies on social learning...This is an evocative book..." Ethology

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    Product details

    • Date Published: November 2006
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521031950
    • length: 440 pages
    • copublisher: The Zoological Society of London
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 25 mm
    • weight: 0.64kg
    • contains: 49 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    List of contributors
    Preface
    Part I. New Perspectives in Studies of Social Learning: Editors' comments Hilary O. Box and Kathleen R. Gibson
    1. The myth of peculiar primates Thelma Rowell
    2. New directions in the study of primate learning Barbara J. King
    3. Temperament and socially mediated learning among primates Hilary O. Box
    4. Evolutionary biology of skill and information transfer Richard M. Sibly
    Part II. Social Learning Among Species of Terrestrial Herbivores: Editors' comments Hilary O. Box and Kathleen R. Gibson
    5. Social learning in marsupials Karen Higginbottom and David B. Croft
    6. The social context for learning and behavioural development among wild African elephants Phyllis C. Lee and Cynthia J. Moss
    7. Comparative social learning among arctic herbivores: the caribou, muskox and arctic hare David R. Klein
    8. Transmission of olfactory information from mother to young in the European rabbit Robyn Hudson, Benoist Schaal and Ágnes Bilkó
    9. Social transfer of information in domestic animals Donald M. Broom
    Part III. Rats, Bats and Naked Mole-Rats: Animals With Information Centres: Editors' comments Kathleen R. Gibson and Hilary O. Box
    10. Exploring the dynamics of social transmission with rats Kevin N. Laland
    11. Social influences on foraging in bats Gerald S. Wilkinson and Janette Wenrick Boughman
    12. Social transmission of information in a eusocial rodent, the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) Chris G. Faulkes
    Part IV. Social Learning Among Species of Terrestrial Carnivores: Editors' comments Hilary O. Box and Kathleen R. Gibson
    13. Opportunities for social learning in bears Barrie K. Gilbert
    14. Watch with mother: a review of social learning in the Felidae Andrew C. Kitchener
    15. Social learning in canids: an ecological perspective Jan A. J. Nel
    Part V. Dolphins and Whales: Communication and Foraging in Aquatic Environments: Editors' comments Kathleen R. Gibson and Hilary O. Box
    16. Social learning in cetaceans: hunting, hearing and hierarchies James R. Boran and Sara L. Heimlich
    17. Origins and implications of vocal learning in bottlenose dolphins Vincent M. Janik
    Part VI. The Great Ape-Human Adaptation: Culture and the Cognitive Niche: Editors' comments Kathleen R. Gibson and Hilary O. Box
    18. Cognition in great ape ecology: skill-learning ability opens up foraging opportunities Richard W. Byrne
    19. Social transmission of facts and skills in the human species: neural mechanisms Kathleen R. Gibson
    20. Cultural learning in hominids: a behavioural ecological approach Stephen J. Shennan and James Steele
    21. Imitation and cultural change: a view from the Stone Age, with specific reference to the manufacture of handaxes Steven Mithen
    Part VII. Concluding Remarks:
    22. Social learning and behavioural strategies among mammals Hilary O. Box and Kathleen R. Gibson
    Index.

  • Editors

    Hilary O. Box, University of Reading

    Kathleen R. Gibson, University of Texas, Houston

    Contributors

    Hilary O. Box, Kathleen R. Gibson, Thelma Rowell, Barbara J. King, Richard M. Sibly, Karen Higginbottom, David B. Croft, Phyllis C. Lee, Cynthia J. Moss, David R. Klein, Robyn Hudson, Benoist Schaal, Ágnes Bilkó, Donald M. Broom, Kevin N. Laland, Gerald S. Wilkinson, Janette Wenrick Bauman, Chris G. Faulkes, Barrie K. Gilbert, Andrew C. Kitchener, Jan A. J. Nel, James R. Boran, Sara L. Heimlich, Vincent M. Janik, Richard W. Byrne, Stephan J. Shennan, James Steele, Steven Mithen

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