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Literature, Science and Exploration in the Romantic Era

Literature, Science and Exploration in the Romantic Era
Bodies of Knowledge

$57.00 (C)

Part of Cambridge Studies in Romanticism

  • Date Published: July 2007
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521039956

$ 57.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • The authors of this study examine the massive impact of colonial exploration upon British scientific and literary activity between the 1760s and 1830s. This broad-ranging survey will appeal to literary and cultural studies scholars.

    • Broad-ranging study examining the effects of exploration and colonialism on the development of science and culture in the Romantic era
    • Well illustrated
    • Written by three eminent experts
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "This well-written, meticulously researched book should be in every collection supporting the study of Romantic literature. Essential."
    -Choice

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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2007
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521039956
    • length: 348 pages
    • dimensions: 228 x 152 x 19 mm
    • weight: 0.524kg
    • contains: 23 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    List of illustrations
    Acknowledgements
    A note on the text
    Frequently cited texts
    Introduction: bodies of knowledge
    Part I. Exploration, Science and Literature:
    1. Sir Joseph Banks and his networks
    2. Tahiti in London
    London in Tahiti: tools of power
    3. Indian flowers and Romantic Orientalism
    4. Mental travellers: Banks, African exploration and the Romantic imagination
    5. Banks, Bligh and the breadfruit: slave plantations, tropical islands and the rhetoric of Romanticism
    6. Exploration, headhunting and race theory: the skull beneath the skin
    7. Theories of terrestrial magnetism and the search for the poles
    Part II. British Science and Literature in the Context of Empire:
    8. 'Man electrified man': Romantic revolution and the legacy of Benjamin Franklin
    9. The beast within: vaccination, Romanticism and the Jenneration of disease
    10. Britain's little black boys and the technologies of benevolence
    Conclusion
    Notes
    Index.

  • Authors

    Tim Fulford, Nottingham Trent University
    Dr Tim Fulford is Professor in the Department of English and Media Studies at Nottingham Trent University. He is the author of Landscape, Liberty and Authority: Poetry, Criticism and Politics from Thomson to Wordsworth (Cambridge, 1996) and Romanticism and Masculinity (1999) and co-editor with Peter J. Kitson of Romanticism and Colonialism (Cambridge, 1998).

    Debbie Lee, Washington State University
    Peter J. Kitson is Professor in the Department of English at Dundee University. He is co-editor with Timothy Fulford of Romanticism and Colonialism (Cambridge, 1998).

    Peter J. Kitson, University of Dundee
    Debbie Lee is Professor of English at Washington State University. She is the author of Slavery and the Romantic Imagination (2002) and co-editor with Peter J. Kitson of Abolition, and Emancipation: Writings in the British Romantic Period (2000).

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