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Women, Literature, and the Domesticated Landscape
England's Disciples of Flora, 1780–1870

$101.00

Part of Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture

  • Date Published: March 2011
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521768658

$101.00
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About the Authors
  • Combining an analysis of literature and art, this book contends that the ‘domesticated landscape' is key to understanding women's complex negotiation of private and public life in a period of revolution and transition. As more women became engaged in horticultural and botanical pursuits, the meaning of gardens – recognized here both as sites of pleasure and labor, and as conceptual and symbolic spaces – became more complex. Women writers and artists often used gardens to educate their readers, to enter into political and cultural debates, and to signal moments of intellectual and spiritual insight. Gardens functioned as a protected vantage point for women, providing them with a new language and authority to negotiate between domestic space and the larger world. Although this more expansive form of domesticity still highlighted the virtues associated with the feminized home, it also promised a wider field of action, re-centering domesticity outward.

    • Offers new and original insights into women's lives and ways of writing, through their relationship to the landscape
    • A collaboration between an art historian and a literary scholar, combining the insights and methodologies of both disciplines
    • Includes over 70 illustrations fully analyzed and integrated into the text, providing an enriched context for analysis of art and literature
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "This volume will be useful to a wide range of readers. Scholars of the genre will delight in the richness of the textual references and use of illustrations to ground the discussions. Page and Smith deftly weave critical threads from other scholars and pull those arguments further in interesting directions. An extensive list of works cited is worthy reading in itself for those interested in further exploration of the topics covered....For readers less familiar with the genres of botanical writing and garden literature in the two periods, this text will open up surprising areas of exploration and perhaps create new points of connection with their own critical interests."
    -Patricia Peek, Romantic Circle July 2011

    "This book equips us to textually, historically, and visually understand gardens as spaces continually central to women’s socialization over a century of restless cultural change."
    --Nineteenth-Century Contexts

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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2011
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521768658
    • length: 338 pages
    • dimensions: 244 x 170 x 21 mm
    • weight: 0.74kg
    • contains: 72 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    Part I. Moral Order: The School of Nature:
    1. 'In the home garden': moral tales for children
    2. The 'botanic eye': botany, miniature, and magnification
    Part II. The Visual Frame: Constructing a View:
    3. Picturing the 'home landscape': the nature of accomplishment
    4. Commanding a view: the Taylor sisters and the construction of domestic space
    Part III. Personal Practice: Making Gardens Grow:
    5. Dorothy Wordsworth: gardening, self-fashioning, and creation of home
    6. 'Work in a small compass': gardening manuals for women
    Part IV. Narrative Strategies: Plotting the Garden:
    7. 'Unbought pleasure': gardening in Cœlebs in Search of a Wife and Mansfield Park
    8. Margaret Oliphant's Chronicles of Carlingford and the meaning of Victorian gardens
    Epilogue.

  • Authors

    Judith W. Page, University of Florida
    Judith W. Page is Professor of English and Waldo W. Neikirk Term Professor of Arts and Sciences at the University of Florida, where she also serves as Interim Director of the Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research.

    Elise L. Smith, Millsaps College, Mississippi
    Elise L. Smith is Professor of Art History and Sanderson Chair in Arts and Sciences at Millsaps College, Mississippi.

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