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Shakespeare and Textual Studies

$120.00 (C)

Margaret Jane Kidnie, Sonia Massai, Heather Hirschfeld, Paul Werstine, James Purkis, Helen Smith, Alan B. Farmer, Zachary Lesser, Peter Stallybrass, Emma Smith, Laura Estill, Jean-Christophe Mayer, Jeffrey Todd Knight, Alan Galey, W. B. Worthen, Peter Holland, Keir Elam, Andrew Murphy, Leah S. Marcus, Lukas Erne, John Jowett, Alan C. Dessen, Matthew Dimmock, Tiffany Stern, Jill L. Levenson, Eric Rasmussen, David Weinberger
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  • Date Published: November 2015
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107023741

$ 120.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Shakespeare and Textual Studies gathers contributions from the leading specialists in the fields of manuscript and textual studies, book history, editing, and digital humanities to provide a comprehensive reassessment of how manuscript, print and digital practices have shaped the body of works that we now call 'Shakespeare'. This cutting-edge collection identifies the legacies of previous theories and places special emphasis on the most recent developments in the editing of Shakespeare since the 'turn to materialism' in the late twentieth century. Providing a wide-ranging overview of current approaches and debates, the book explores Shakespeare's poems and plays in light of new evidence, engaging scholars, editors, and book historians in conversations about the recovery of early composition and publication, and the ongoing appropriation and transmission of Shakespeare's works through new technologies.

    • Contributors include a wide range of experts, from Shakespeare editors, to manuscript and textual scholars, book historian and digital humanities specialists
    • Presents the latest evidence about the treatment of Shakespeare's texts in the early modern period and identifies the legacies of older theories and practices in current approaches
    • Discusses the transmission of Shakespeare's texts through manuscript, print and digital technologies and explains the impact of archival research upon the editing of Shakespeare
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "This collection is most insightful - essential reading for editors and textual scholars. Kidnie and Massai assemble the very best Shakespeareans to examine crucial debates about the origins, production and subsequent uses of Shakespeare's texts."
    Eugene Giddens, Anglia Ruskin University

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    Product details

    • Date Published: November 2015
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107023741
    • length: 482 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 27 mm
    • weight: 0.9kg
    • contains: 34 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction Margaret Jane Kidnie and Sonia Massai
    Part I. Scripts and Manuscripts:
    1. Playwriting in Shakespeare's time: authorship, collaboration, and attribution Heather Hirschfeld
    2. Ralph Crane and Edward Knight Paul Werstine
    3. Shakespeare's strayng manuscripts James Purkis
    Part II. Making Books
    Building Reputations:
    4. The mixed fortunes of Shakespeare in print Sonia Massai
    5. 'To London all'? Mapping Shakespeare in print, 1593–8 Helen Smith
    6. Shakespeare as leading playwright in print, 1598–1608/9 Alan B. Farmer
    7. Shakespeare between pamphlet and book Zachary Lesser and Peter Stallybrass
    8. The canonization of Shakespeare in print:
    1623 Emma Smith
    Part III. From Print to Manuscript:
    9. Commonplacing readers Laura Estill
    10. Annotating and transcribing for the theatre – Shakespeare's early modern reader revisers at work Jean-Christophe Mayer
    11. Shakespeare and the collection: reading beyond readers' marks Jeffrey Todd Knight
    12. Encoding as editing as reading Alan Galey
    13. Going postal
    or, performing postprint Shakespeare W. B. Worthen
    Part IV. Editorial Legacies:
    14. Theatre editions Peter Holland
    15. Editing Shakespeare by pictures Keir Elam
    16. Format and readerships Andrew Murphy
    17. A man who needs no introduction Leah S. Marcus
    18. Emendation and the editorial reconfiguration of Shakespeare Lukas Erne
    Part V. Editorial Practices:
    19. Full pricks and great p's: spellings, punctuation, accidentals John Jowett
    20. Divided Shakespeare Alan C. Dessen
    21. Shakespeare's strange tongues Matthew Dimmock
    22. Before the beginning
    after the end: when did plays start and stop? Tiffany Stern
    Part VI. Apparatus and the Fashioning of Knowledge:
    23. Framing Shakespeare: introductions and commentary in critical editions of the plays Jill L. Levenson
    24. Editorial memory Eric Rasmussen
    25. Shakespeare as network David Weinberger.

  • Editors

    Margaret Jane Kidnie, University of Western Ontario
    Margaret Jane Kidnie is Professor of English at the University of Western Ontario. She is the author of Shakespeare and the Problem of Adaptation and her edition of Philip Stubbes: The Anatomie of Abuses won Honorable Mention from the MLA's Committee on Scholarly Editions. She has also edited Jonson for Oxford University Press and her edition of Thomas Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness was published in 2015. Textual Performances: The Modern Reproduction of Shakespeare's Drama, which she co-edited with Lukas Erne, was nominated Book of the Year in the Times Literary Supplement.

    Sonia Massai, King's College London
    Sonia Massai is Professor of Shakespeare Studies at King's College London. She has published widely in the fields of Shakespeare Textual Studies and the Editing of Shakespeare, including The Rise of the Editor (Cambridge, 2007), an Arden Early Modern Drama edition of John Ford's 'Tis Pity She's a Whore (2011) and an edition of Paratexts in English Printed Drama to 1642 (Cambridge, 2014). She has also contributed to refereed journals, such as Shakespeare Survey and Studies in English Literature, and to collections of essays on the textual transmission of Shakespeare.

    Contributors

    Margaret Jane Kidnie, Sonia Massai, Heather Hirschfeld, Paul Werstine, James Purkis, Helen Smith, Alan B. Farmer, Zachary Lesser, Peter Stallybrass, Emma Smith, Laura Estill, Jean-Christophe Mayer, Jeffrey Todd Knight, Alan Galey, W. B. Worthen, Peter Holland, Keir Elam, Andrew Murphy, Leah S. Marcus, Lukas Erne, John Jowett, Alan C. Dessen, Matthew Dimmock, Tiffany Stern, Jill L. Levenson, Eric Rasmussen, David Weinberger

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