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Shakespeare Survey

Volume 66. Working with Shakespeare

$130.00 (C)

Part of Shakespeare Survey

Tiffany Stern, Cordelia Zukerman, Hugh Craig, Reiko Oya, David Schalkwyk, Richard Wilson, Janet Bottoms, Michael Cordner, Michael Pavelka, Carol Chillington Rutter, Tobias Döring, Stephen Purcell, Péter Dávidházi, John Drakakis, Hester Lees-Jeffries, Scott L. Newstok, Ton Hoenselaars, Kiernan Ryan, R. S. White, Michael Neill, Richard Meek, M. Lindsay Kaplan, Erica Sheen, James Hirsh, Varsha Panjwani, James Shaw, Charlotte Scott, Russell Jackson, Sonia Massai
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  • Date Published: March 2014
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107041738

$130.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • Shakespeare Survey is a yearbook of Shakespeare studies and production. Since 1948, the Survey has published the best international scholarship in English and many of its essays have become classics of Shakespeare criticism. Each volume is devoted to a theme, or play, or group of plays; each also contains a section of reviews of that year's textual and critical studies and of the year's major British performances. The theme for Volume 66 is 'Working with Shakespeare', and Tiffany Stern's essay has been selected by the Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society for its Barbara Palmer/Martin Stevens award for best new essay in early drama studies, 2014. The complete set of Survey volumes is also available online at http://www.cambridge.org/online/shakespearesurvey. This fully searchable resource enables users to browse by author, essay and volume, search by play, theme and topic and save and bookmark their results.

    Reviews & endorsements

    "Tiffany Stern's essay, 'Sermons, Plays and Note-Takers: Hamlet Q1 as a 'Noted' Text', reads like an especially well-written and deftly plotted mystery novel. Taking as her subject the so-called 'bad quarto' of Hamlet, Stern leads the reader through a thoroughly documented and totally compelling rethinking of Q1’s origins. [She] persuasively argues that this text is the product of a note-taking scribal audience who employed contemporary notational habits to produce a 'pirated' text for publication … [She] brings to life a new world of early modern performance through descriptions and details that offer many small openings onto the textual culture of the period … this essay not only offers a significant reassessment of Hamlet Q1, but also makes a claim for the cultural importance of note-taking practices in the early modern period more generally."
    Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society

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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2014
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107041738
    • length: 484 pages
    • dimensions: 253 x 195 x 32 mm
    • weight: 1.1kg
    • contains: 39 b/w illus.
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. Sermons, plays and note-takers: Hamlet Q1 as a 'noted' text Tiffany Stern
    2. Equivocations: reading the Shakespeare/Middleton Macbeth Cordelia Zukerman
    3. The date of Sir Thomas More Hugh Craig
    4. Filming 'the weight of this sad time': Yasujiro Ozu's rereading of King Lear in Tokyo Story (1953) Reiko Oya
    5. Cursing to learn: theatricality and the creation of character in The Tempest David Schalkwyk
    6. Like an Olympian wrestling Richard Wilson
    7. 'Doing Shakespeare': how Shakespeare became a school 'subject' Janet Bottoms
    8. (Mis)advising Shakespeare's players Michael Cordner
    9. Making the work of play Michael Pavelka (in conversation with Carol Chillington Rutter)
    10. 'On the wrong track to ourselves': Armin Senser's Shakespeare and the issue of artistic creativity in contemporary German poetry Tobias Döring
    11. 'What country, friends, is this?': Cultural identity and the World Shakespeare Festival Stephen Purcell
    12. Redefining knowledge: an epistemological shift in Shakespeare studies Péter Dávidházi
    13. Shakespeare as presentist John Drakakis
    14. Greater Shakespeare: working, playing and making with Shakespeare Hester Lees-Jeffries
    15. 'A joint and corporate voice': re-working Shakespearean seminars Scott L. Newstok
    16. Shakespeare and the cultures of translation Ton Hoenselaars
    17. Shakespeare's inhumanity Kiernan Ryan
    18. Making something out of 'nothing' in Shakespeare R. S. White
    19. 'A book where one may read strange matters': en-visaging character and emotion on the Shakespearean stage Michael Neill
    20. 'Hear the ambassadors!': Marking Shakespeare's Venice connection Carol Chillington Rutter
    21. 'O, what a sympathy of woe is this': passionate sympathy in Titus Andronicus Richard Meek
    22. Who drew the Jew that Shakespeare knew?: Misericords and medieval Jews in The Merchant Of Venice M. Lindsay Kaplan
    23. 'Imaginary puissance': Shakespearean theatre and the law of agency in Henry V, Twelfth Night and Measure For Measure Erica Sheen
    24. Hamlet and empiricism James Hirsh
    25. 'Let me see what thou hast writ': mapping the Shakespeare–Fletcher working relationship in The Two Noble Kinsmen at the Swan Varsha Panjwani
    26. Shakespeare performances in England (and Wales) 2012 Carol Chillington Rutter
    27. Professional Shakespeare productions in the British Isles, January-December 2011 James Shaw
    28. The year's contribution to Shakespeare studies:
    1. Critical studies reviewed by Charlotte Scott
    2. Shakespeare in performance reviewed by Russell Jackson
    3. Editions and textual studies reviewed by Sonia Massai.

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    Shakespeare Survey

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  • Editor

    Peter Holland
    Peter Holland is McMeel Family Professor in Shakespeare Studies and Department Chair, Department of Film, Television and Theater at the University of Notre Dame.

    Contributors

    Tiffany Stern, Cordelia Zukerman, Hugh Craig, Reiko Oya, David Schalkwyk, Richard Wilson, Janet Bottoms, Michael Cordner, Michael Pavelka, Carol Chillington Rutter, Tobias Döring, Stephen Purcell, Péter Dávidházi, John Drakakis, Hester Lees-Jeffries, Scott L. Newstok, Ton Hoenselaars, Kiernan Ryan, R. S. White, Michael Neill, Richard Meek, M. Lindsay Kaplan, Erica Sheen, James Hirsh, Varsha Panjwani, James Shaw, Charlotte Scott, Russell Jackson, Sonia Massai

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