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Genetic Research on Addiction
Ethics, the Law, and Public Health

$93.00 ( ) USD

Audrey R. Chapman, Rebecca Mathews, Adrian Carter, Wayne Hall, Carl Erik Fisher, Deborah Hasin, Paul Appelbaum, David S. Festinger, Karen L. Dugosh, Thomas McMahon, Mark A. Rothstein, Zita Lazzarini, David B. Resnik, Peter J. Adams, Thomas Babor, Jo C. Phelan, Bruce G. Link, Toby Jayaratne, Alicia Giordimaina, Amy Gaviglio, Jonathan M. Kaplan
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  • Date Published: August 2012
  • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • format: Adobe eBook Reader
  • isbn: 9781139558914

$ 93.00 USD ( )
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  • The manner in which genetic research associated with addiction is conducted, interpreted and translated into clinical practice and policy initiatives raises important social, ethical and legal issues. Genetic Research on Addiction fulfils two key aims; the first is to identify the ethical issues and requirements arising when carrying out genetically-based addiction research, and the second is to explore the ethical, legal and public policy implications of interpreting, translating and applying this research. The book describes research guidelines on human protection issues such as improving the informed consent process, protecting privacy, responsibilities to minors and determining whether to accept industry funding. The broader public health policy implications of the research are explored and guidelines offered for developing effective social interventions. Highly relevant for clinicians, researchers, academics and policy-makers in the fields of addiction, mental health and public policy.

    • Provides an overview of ethical challenges when conducting genetic research on addiction, aiding identification of potential problems
    • Considers a wide range of human subject protection issues and provides practical recommendations and guidelines
    • Explores ethical issues in translating genetic research on addiction into policy
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    Product details

    • Date Published: August 2012
    • format: Adobe eBook Reader
    • isbn: 9781139558914
    • contains: 1 b/w illus.
    • availability: This ISBN is for an eBook version which is distributed on our behalf by a third party.
  • Table of Contents

    Abstracts
    Part I. Introduction:
    1. Introduction to volume Audrey R. Chapman
    2. The implications of genetic research on alcohol dependence for prevention and treatment Rebecca Mathews, Adrian Carter and Wayne Hall
    3. Promises and risks for participants in studies of genetic risk for alcohol or drug dependence Carl Erik Fisher, Deborah Hasin and Paul Appelbaum
    Part II. Research Ethics:
    4. Improving the informed consent process in research with substance abusing participants David S. Festinger and Karen L. Dugosh
    5. Ethical responsibilities to minor children with drug abusing parents in research trials Thomas McMahon
    6. Protecting privacy in genetic research on alcoholism and other addictions Mark A. Rothstein
    7. Uses and limitations of certificates of confidentiality for protecting research on addiction Zita Lazzarini
    8. Ethical issues in genomic databases and biobanks involving human subjects David B. Resnik
    9. Should addiction researchers accept funding derived from the profits of addictive consumptions? Peter J. Adams
    10. Ethical issues related to alcohol research funding from the alcohol beverage industry Thomas Babor
    Part III. Translating Addiction Research:
    11. The public health implications of genetic research on addiction Rebecca Mathews, Wayne Hall and Adrian Carter
    12. Genetics, addiction, and stigma Jo C. Phelan and Bruce G. Link
    13. Lay beliefs about genetic influences on alcoholism: implications for prevention and treatment Toby Jayaratne, Alicia Giordimaina and Amy Gaviglio
    14. Personalizing risk: how behavioral genetics research into addiction makes the political personal Jonathan M. Kaplan
    Part IV. Conclusions:
    15. Conclusions and guidelines for conducting and translating research on alcohol dependence and addiction Audrey R. Chapman, Jonathan M. Kaplan and Adrian Carter
    Index.

  • Editor

    Audrey Chapman, University of Connecticut School of Medicine
    Audrey R. Chapman is Healey Professor of Medical Ethics and Humanities, Department of Community Medicine and Health Care, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA.

    Contributors

    Audrey R. Chapman, Rebecca Mathews, Adrian Carter, Wayne Hall, Carl Erik Fisher, Deborah Hasin, Paul Appelbaum, David S. Festinger, Karen L. Dugosh, Thomas McMahon, Mark A. Rothstein, Zita Lazzarini, David B. Resnik, Peter J. Adams, Thomas Babor, Jo C. Phelan, Bruce G. Link, Toby Jayaratne, Alicia Giordimaina, Amy Gaviglio, Jonathan M. Kaplan

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