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Information Technology and Moral Philosophy

$109.99

Part of Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy

Terrell Ward Bynum, Luciano Floridi, James Bohman, Cass R. Sunstein, Alvin I. Goldman, Dean Cocking, Steve Matthews, Philip Pettit, Geoffrey Brennan, Charles Ess, Seumas Miller, Deborah G. Johnson, Thomas M. Powers, Wendy J. Gordon, Jeroen van den Hoven, Mary Flanagan, Daniel C. Howe, Helen Nissenbaum, Dag Elgesem, Emma Rooksby
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  • Date Published: March 2008
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521855495

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About the Authors
  • This book gives an in-depth philosophical analysis of moral problems to which information technology gives rise, for example, problems related to privacy, intellectual property, responsibility, friendship, and trust, with contributions from many of the best-known philosophers writing in the area.

    • Comprehensive coverage of topics from privacy and blogging to Confucius and Plato
    • Shows why we need a new ethical debate for emerging technologies
    • Looks at IT from a philosophical point of view
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "This collection of 18 essay is rich in ideas on the implications of information technology and morality. Variety is the collection's strong point, though there are certainly some common themes, including the nature of identity and agency...This work will appeal to scholars in several disciples, including communication, political science, computer science, and philosophy. Summing up: Recommended."
    -S.E. Forschler, Choice

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    Product details

    • Date Published: March 2008
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521855495
    • length: 428 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 27 mm
    • weight: 0.8kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    1. Norbert Wiener and the rise of information ethics Terrell Ward Bynum
    2. Why we need better ethics for emerging technologies James H. Moor
    3. Information ethics: its nature and scope Luciano Floridi
    4. The transformation of the public sphere: political authority, communicative freedom, and internet publics James Bohman
    5. Democracy and the internet Cass R. Sunstein
    6. The social epistemology of blogging Alvin I. Goldman
    7. Plural selves and relational identity: intimacy and privacy online Dean Cocking
    8. Identity and information technology Steve Matthews
    9. Trust, reliance, and the internet Philip Pettit
    10. Esteem, identifiability, and the internet Geoffrey Brennan and Philip Pettit
    11. Culture and global networks: hope for a global ethics? Charles Ess
    12. Collective responsibility and information and communication technology Seumas Miller
    13. Computers as surrogate agents Deborah G. Johnson and Thomas M. Powers
    14. Moral philosophy, information technology, and copyright: the Grokster case Wendy J. Gordon
    15. Information technology, privacy, and the protection of personal data Jeroen van den Hoven
    16. Embodying values in technology: theory and practice Mary Flanagan, Daniel C. Howe and Helen Nissenbaum
    17. Information technology research ethics Dag Elgesem
    18. Distributive justice and the value of information: a (broadly) Rawlsian approach Jeroen van den Hoven and Emma Rooksby.

  • Editors

    Jeroen van den Hoven
    John Weckert is a Professorial Fellow at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics at Charles Sturt University in Australia. He is editor-in-chief of NanoEthics: Ethics for Technologies that Converge at the Nanoscale and has published widely in the field of computer ethics.

    John Weckert, Charles Sturt University, Albury, New South Wales
    Jeroen van den Hoven is Professor of Moral Philosophy at Delft University of Technology. He is editor-in-chief of Ethics and Information Technology, a member of the IST Advisory Group of the European Community in Brussels, scientific director of the 3TU Centre for Ethics and Technology in the Netherlands, and co-author, with Dean Cocking, of Evil Online.

    Contributors

    Terrell Ward Bynum, Luciano Floridi, James Bohman, Cass R. Sunstein, Alvin I. Goldman, Dean Cocking, Steve Matthews, Philip Pettit, Geoffrey Brennan, Charles Ess, Seumas Miller, Deborah G. Johnson, Thomas M. Powers, Wendy J. Gordon, Jeroen van den Hoven, Mary Flanagan, Daniel C. Howe, Helen Nissenbaum, Dag Elgesem, Emma Rooksby

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