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Look Inside The Physics of Information Technology

The Physics of Information Technology

Part of Cambridge Series on Information and the Natural Sciences

  • Date Published: June 2011
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521210225

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About the Authors
  • The Physics of Information Technology explores the familiar devices that we use to collect, transform, transmit, and interact with electronic information. Many such devices operate surprisingly close to very many fundamental physical limits. Understanding how such devices work, and how they can (and cannot) be improved, requires deep insight into the character of physical law as well as engineering practice. The book starts with an introduction to units, forces, and the probabilistic foundations of noise and signaling, then progresses through the electromagnetics of wired and wireless communications, and the quantum mechanics of electronic, optical, and magnetic materials, to discussions of mechanisms for computation, storage, sensing, and display. This self-contained volume will help both physical scientists and computer scientists see beyond the conventional division between hardware and software to understand the implications of physical theory for information manipulation.

    • From the author of The Nature of Mathematical Modeling (1998), which sold more than 5000 copies in a little over a year
    • Author also wrote the best-selling When Things Start to Think (Hodder)
    • Author from the world-famous Center for Bits and Atoms at MIT
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "...throughout the text, Gershenfeld retains much of the conversational tone and spontaneity of a lecture. At its best, this makes for enjoyable reading, with interesting tidbits and asides that enliven the discussions....Gershenfeld's book will be valuable for physical scientists looking for an enjoyable introduction to the information sciences. And anyone wishing to learn more about diverse areas of physics related to
    Science

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    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2011
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521210225
    • length: 388 pages
    • dimensions: 244 x 170 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.62kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Preface
    1. Introduction
    2. Interactions, units, and magnitudes
    3. Noise in physical systems
    4. Information in physical systems
    5. Electromagnetic fields and waves
    6. Circuits, transmission lines, and wave guides
    7. Multipoles and antennas
    8. Optics
    9. Lensless imaging and inverse problems
    10. Semiconductor materials and devices
    11. Generating, modulating, and detecting light
    12. Magnetic storage
    13. Measurement and coding
    14. Transducers
    15. Timekeeping and navigation
    16. Quantum computing and communications
    Appendix 1. Problem solutions.

  • Author

    Neil Gershenfeld, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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