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Minority Rights, Majority Rule
Partisanship and the Development of Congress

$85.00

  • Date Published: June 1997
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521582391

$85.00
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About the Authors
  • Minority Rights, Majority Rule seeks to explain why majority parties have consistently been so powerful in the U.S. House of Representatives while minorities often prevail in the Senate. Dr. Binder charts the history of minority rights in both chambers and explains how partisan battles--fought under rules inherited from the past--have shaped the creation and suppression of minority rights. Dr. Binder's statistical analysis and historical work provide the first comprehensive account of the development of minority rights in Congress and contribute to literature on the historical development of Congress.

    • Melds historical research and statistical analysis to explain elements of congressional development
    • Contributes to growing literature that gives political parties a central role in explaining the evolution of legislative insitutions
    • Offers a comprehensive account of procedural change in both the US House and Senate
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "This is an extremely interesting book and one in which the author makes a convincing case for her various positions. It will I am sure, be accepted for a long time as an important contribution to the history of the U.S. Congress, to the study of American Congressional Politics, and to our understanding of institutionalization processes in the United States." Allen G. Bogue, H-Net Reviews

    "Binder's use of history makes the development of minority party rights come alive." Alison D. Howard, LSS Newsletter

    "In an age when partisan politics and congressional gridlock are under attack, Sarah A. Binder's stufy of procedural change in the House of Representatives and the Senate is most timely. Political historians will find this succinct, never overstated study valuable. Scrupulously documented, it is based on a thorough study of congressional sources such as the Congressional Globe and the Congressional Record, as well as works in political science." Donald B. Cole, The Journal of American History

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    Product details

    • Date Published: June 1997
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521582391
    • length: 256 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 19 mm
    • weight: 0.55kg
    • contains: 15 b/w illus. 23 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. The partisan basis of procedural choice
    2. The evolving concepts of house and Senate minority rights
    3. Procedural choice in the early congress: the case of the Previous Question
    4. Allocating minority rights in the house, 1789–1990
    5. Institutionalizing party in the nineteenth century house
    6. Stacking the partisan decks in the twentieth century house
    7. Inherited rules and procedural choice in the Senate
    8. Assessing the partisan theory
    Appendices
    References.

  • Author

    Sarah A. Binder, Brookings Institution, Washington DC

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