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Patrons, Clients and Policies
Patterns of Democratic Accountability and Political Competition

Herbert Kitschelt, Steven I. Wilkinson, Nicolas Van de Walle, Luis Fernando Medina, Susan C. Stokes, Kanchan Chandra, Anirudh Krishna, Mona M. Lyne, Beatriz Magaloni, Alberto Diaz-Cayeros, Federico Estévez, Steven Levitsky, Henry Hale, Wolfgang C. Müller, Ethan Scheiner
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  • Date Published: April 2007
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521690041

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  • Most models of party competition assume that citizens vote for a platform rather than narrowly targeted material benefits. However, there are many countries where politicians win elections by giving money, jobs, and services in direct exchange for votes. This is not just true in the developing world, but also in economically developed countries - such as Japan and Austria - that clearly meet the definition of stable, modern democracies. This book offers explanations for why politicians engage in clientelistic behaviours and why voters respond. Using newly collected data on national and sub-national patterns of patronage and electoral competition, the contributors demonstrate why explanations based on economic modernization or electoral institutions cannot account for international variation in patron-client and programmatic competition. Instead, they show how the interaction of economic development, party competition, governance of the economy, and ethnic heterogeneity may work together to determine the choices of patrons, clients and policies.

    • Argues that clientelism and patronage exist in developed as well as developing countries, and seeks to explain this phenomenon
    • Uses newly collected data on national and sub-national patterns of patronage and electoral competition
    • Will appeal to academic researchers and graduate students in comparative politics, political economy, political sociology and development studies
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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2007
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521690041
    • length: 392 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 22 mm
    • weight: 0.57kg
    • contains: 34 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Citizen-politician linkages: an introduction Herbert Kitschelt and Steven I. Wilkinson
    2. Meet the new boss, same as the old boss? The evolution of political clientelism in Africa Nicolas Van de Walle
    3. Monopoly and monitoring: an approach to political clientelism Luis Fernando Medina and Susan C. Stokes
    4. Counting heads: a theory of voter and elite behavior in patronage democracies Kanchan Chandra
    5. Explaining changing patterns of party-voter linkages in India Steven I. Wilkinson
    6. Politics in the middle: mediating relationships between the citizens and the state in rural North India Anirudh Krishna
    7. Rethinking economics and institutions: the voter's dilemma and democratic accountability Mona M. Lyne
    8. Clientelism and portfolio diversification: a model of electoral investment with applications to Mexico Beatriz Magaloni, Alberto Diaz-Cayeros and Federico Estévez
    9. From populism to clientelism? The transformation of labor-based party linkages in Latin America Steven Levitsky
    10. Correlates of clientelism: political economy, politicized ethnicity, and postcommunist transition Henry Hale
    11. Political institutions and linkage strategies Wolfgang C. Müller
    12. Clientelism in Japan: the importance and limits of institutional explanations Ethan Scheiner
    13. The demise of clientelism in affluent capitalist democracies Herbert Kitschelt
    14. A research agenda for the study of citizen-politician linkages and democratic accountability Herbert Kitschelt and Steven I. Wilkinson.

  • Editors

    Herbert Kitschelt, Duke University, North Carolina
    Herbert Kitschelt is George V. Allen Professor of International Relations in the Department of Political Science at Duke University. He is the editor of Continuity and Change in Contemporary Capitalism (with Peter Lange, Gary Marks and John D. Stephens, 1999) and author of Post-Communist Party Systems: Competition, Representation, and Inter-Party Cooperation (with Zdenka Mansfeldova, Radoslaw Markowski and Gabor Toka, 1999), The Transformation of European Social Democracy (1994) and The Radical Right in Western Europe (1995) which won the Woodrow Wilson Award of the APSA in 1996.

    Steven I. Wilkinson, Department of Political Science, Yale University, Connecticut
    Steven I. Wilkinson is Nilekani Professor of India and South Asia and Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at Yale University. His book Votes and Violence: Electoral Competition and Ethnic Riots in India (Cambridge University Press, 2004) was co-winner of the American Political Science Association's 2005 Woodrow Wilson Foundation prize. He is currently researching the links between colonial inheritances and post-independence levels of democracy, governance and conflict.

    Contributors

    Herbert Kitschelt, Steven I. Wilkinson, Nicolas Van de Walle, Luis Fernando Medina, Susan C. Stokes, Kanchan Chandra, Anirudh Krishna, Mona M. Lyne, Beatriz Magaloni, Alberto Diaz-Cayeros, Federico Estévez, Steven Levitsky, Henry Hale, Wolfgang C. Müller, Ethan Scheiner

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