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Domestic Law Goes Global
Legal Traditions and International Courts

$45.99 (C)

  • Date Published: December 2013
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107661677

$ 45.99 (C)
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About the Authors
  • International courts have proliferated in the international system, with over one hundred judicial or quasi-judicial bodies in existence today. This book develops a rational legal design theory of international adjudication in order to explain the variation in state support for international courts. Initial negotiators of new courts, 'originators', design international courts in ways that are politically and legally optimal. States joining existing international courts, 'joiners', look to the legal rules and procedures to assess the courts' ability to be capable, fair and unbiased. The authors demonstrate that the characteristics of civil law, common law and Islamic law influence states' acceptance of the jurisdiction of international courts, the durability of states' commitments to international courts, and the design of states' commitments to the courts. Furthermore, states strike cooperative agreements most effectively in the shadow of an international court that operates according to familiar legal principles and rules.

    • Proposes a new theory of international courts using insights from rational choice and normative approaches
    • Links states' international behavior to domestic legal systems (civil, common and Islamic)
    • Provides in-depth information about the International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Court
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "Domestic Law Goes Global is highly recommended for those seeking a well-supported analysis of why international tribunals function the way they do."
    --Review in the Journal of International Law and Politics

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    Product details

    • Date Published: December 2013
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107661677
    • length: 278 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 15 mm
    • weight: 0.38kg
    • contains: 9 b/w illus. 30 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. The creation and expansion of international courts
    2. Major legal traditions of the world
    3. A rational legal design theory of international adjudication
    4. Domestic legal traditions and the creation of the International Criminal Court
    5. Domestic legal traditions and state support for the World Court
    6. The rational design of state commitments to international courts
    7. The consequences of support for international courts
    8. Conclusion.

  • Authors

    Sara McLaughlin Mitchell, University of Iowa
    Sara McLaughlin Mitchell is Professor of Political Science and Department Chair at the University of Iowa.

    Emilia Justyna Powell, University of Notre Dame, Indiana
    Emilia Justyna Powell is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Alabama.

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