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Everyday Politics of the World Economy

$111.00

John M. Hobson, Leonard Seabrooke, Andrew Herod, J. C. Sharman, Michele Ford, Nicola Piper, Paul Langley, Adam David Morton, Ara Wilson, Shogo Suzuki
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  • Date Published: December 2007
  • availability: Temporarily unavailable - no date available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521877725

$111.00
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About the Authors
  • How do our everyday actions shape and transform the world economy? This volume of original essays argues that current scholarship in international political economy (IPE) is too highly focused on powerful states and large international institutions. The contributors examine specific forms of ‘everyday’ actions to demonstrate how small-scale actors and their decisions can shape the global economy. They analyse a range of seemingly ordinary or subordinate actors, including peasants, working classes and trade unions, lower-middle and middle classes, female migrant labourers and Eastern diasporas, and examine how they have agency in transforming their political and economic environments. This book offers a novel way of thinking about everyday forms of change across a range of topical issues including globalisation, international finance, trade, taxation, consumerism, labour rights and regimes. It will appeal to students and scholars of politics, international relations, political economy and sociology.

    • Presents a novel theoretical approach to the study of the world economy, by examining everyday life
    • Relates everyday international political economy (IPE) to policy issues to provide a fresh perspective on how it has relevance to policy matters
    • Considers a range of topical issues including globalisation, international finance, trade and regimes
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "The editors conclude by laying out how their approach establishes new puzzles, offers stimulating ways to teach, and introduces new advice for policymaking...Specialists in international political economy and those interested in globalization more generally would do well to pick up this book, for the chapters are sure to prick one’s intellectual curiosity."
    Mark R. Brawley, McGill University, International Journal

    "Hobson, Seabrooke and the contributors to this volume join a select group of scholars who are reconceptualizing the study of the global political economy from the bottom up. The result is a unique set of readings with sophisticated conceptual, policy-relevant and pedagogical implications. This is the most innovative and useful collection of essays to be published in a very long time."
    Robert A. Denemark, University of Delaware

    "Hobson and Seabrooke expertly demonstrate how everyday people have agency in world politics and that agency exists even at the base of the world economy. This book really invites students to become part of a new, incomplete, but exciting research programme – a challenge to which many will want to rise."
    Craig N. Murphy, M. Margaret Ball Professor of International Relations, Department of Political Science, Wellesley College

    "This collection succeeds admirably in setting out an exciting new research and teaching agenda for IPE. Its innovative analysis of how the majority of the world’s population shapes the global economy will be taken up by many other scholars."
    Robert O’Brien, Professor of Global Labour Issues, McMaster University

    "This imaginative volume offers an unusual bottom-up perspective in a field that wraps the practice of everyday life in the convention of mathematics and the language of institutions. In making this move, Seabrooke, Hobson and colleagues succeed in shifting our attention to an area of social life that conventional analyses of political economy rarely reach. A book that opens new ways of thinking about questions of political economy."
    Peter J. Katzenstein, Walter S. Carpenter, Jr. Professor of International Studies, Cornell University

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    Product details

    • Date Published: December 2007
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521877725
    • length: 264 pages
    • dimensions: 236 x 159 x 20 mm
    • weight: 0.542kg
    • contains: 6 tables
    • availability: Temporarily unavailable - no date available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introducing everyday IPE: decentring the discipline - revitalising the margins John M. Hobson and Leonard Seabrooke
    Part I. Regimes as Cultural Weapons of the Weak:
    2. The agency of labour in global change: reimagining the spaces and scales of trade union praxis within a global economy Andrew Herod
    3. The agency of peripheral actors: small state tax havens and international regimes as weapons of the weak J. C. Sharman
    4. Southern sites of female agency: informal regimes and female migrant labour resistance in East Asia Michele Ford and Nicola Piper
    Part II. Global Economic Change From Below:
    5. The everyday social sources of imperial and hegemonic financial orders Leonard Seabrooke
    6. Everyday investor subjects and global financial change: the rise of Anglo-American mass investment Paul Langley
    7. Peasants as subaltern agents in Latin America: neoliberalism, resistance, and the power of the powerless Adam David Morton
    Part III. Bringing Eastern Agents In:
    8. Eastern agents of globalisation: oriental globalisation in the rise of Western capitalism John M. Hobson
    9. Diasporic agents and trans-Asian flows in the making of Asian modernity: the case of Thailand Ara Wilson
    10. The agency of subordinate polities: Western hegemony in the East Asian mirror Shogo Suzuki
    11. Conclusion: everyday IPE research, teaching and policy agendas John M. Hobson and Leonard Seabrooke.

  • Editors

    John M. Hobson, University of Sheffield
    John M. Hobson is Professor of Politics and International Relations at the University of Sheffield.

    Leonard Seabrooke, Copenhagen Business School
    Leonard Seabrooke is Associate Professor in the International Center for Business and Politics at the Copenhagen Business School and Adjunct Senior Fellow in the Department of International Relations at the Australian National University.

    Contributors

    John M. Hobson, Leonard Seabrooke, Andrew Herod, J. C. Sharman, Michele Ford, Nicola Piper, Paul Langley, Adam David Morton, Ara Wilson, Shogo Suzuki

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