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Cosmopolitan Regard
Political Membership and Global Justice

$39.99

Part of Contemporary Political Theory

  • Date Published: April 2010
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521744379

$39.99
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  • Cosmopolitan theory suggests that we should shift our moral attention from the local to the global. Richard Vernon argues, however, that if we adopt cosmopolitan beliefs about justice we must re-examine our beliefs about political obligation. Far from undermining the demands of citizenship, cosmopolitanism implies more demanding political obligations than theories of the state have traditionally recognized. Using examples including humanitarian intervention, international criminal law, and international political economy, Vernon suggests we have a responsibility not to enhance risks facing other societies and to assist them when their own risk-taking has failed. The central arguments in Cosmopolitan Regard are that what we owe to other societies rests on the same basis as what we owe to our own, and that a theory of cosmopolitanism must connect the responsibilities of citizens beyond their own borders with their obligations to one another.

    • Seeks to redefine 'cosmopolitanism' as something that arises from citizenship, rather than competing with it
    • Explains what we owe to other societies as requirements of our own political obligations
    • Discusses critically some of the major current approaches to global justice
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    Reviews & endorsements

    "In this imaginative and ambitious book Richard Vernon sets out an attractive and sophisticated contractarian account of ‘cosmopolitan regard’ that offers a rich and innovative approach to global justice."
    John Horton, Keele University

    "This clearly written book defends an account of patriotic concern that is compatible with the cosmopolitan ideal of equal regard for others. In defense of his own position, Vernon thoroughly and thoughtfully engages the extensive contemporary literature on this important question. The book can thus serve as a useful reference resource for students and scholars wanting to get familiar with the philosophical debates surrounding patriotism, membership and global justice."
    Kok-Chor Tan, University of Pennsylvania

    "Richard Vernon’s book makes an elegant contribution to debates in contemporary political philosophy about the moral basis of our political societies and its implications for the duties we have to those who fall outside of our associative universes of belonging."
    Criminal Law and Philosophy

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    Product details

    • Date Published: April 2010
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521744379
    • length: 232 pages
    • dimensions: 228 x 151 x 11 mm
    • weight: 0.38kg
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    1. Against associative obligations
    2. Particularizing obligation: the normative role of risk
    3. The social waiver
    4. Compatriot Preference and the Iteration Proviso
    5. Humanitarian intervention and the case for natural duty
    6. Associative risk and international crime
    7. A global harm principle?
    Conclusion: citizens in the world.

  • Author

    Richard Vernon, University of Western Ontario
    Richard Vernon is Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Western Ontario.

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