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Is Democracy Exportable?

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Marc F. Plattner, Thomas L. Pangle, Sheri Berman, M. Steven Fish, Daniel Chirot, Adam Seligman, Robert G. Moser, John Carey, Zoltan Barany, Edward Mansfield, Jack Snyder, Mitchell Seligson, Steven Finkel, Aníbal Pérez-Liñán, Nancy Bermeo
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  • Date Published: July 2009
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521748322

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About the Authors
  • Can democratic states transplant the seeds of democracy into developing countries? What have political thinkers going back to the Greek city-states thought about their capacity to promote democracy? How can democracy be established in divided societies? In this timely volume a distinguished group of political scientists seeks answers to these and other fundamental questions behind the concept known as “democracy promotion.” Following an illuminating concise discussion of what political philosophers from Plato to Montesquieu thought about the issue, the authors explore the structural preconditions (culture, divided societies, civil society) as well as the institutions and processes of democracy building (constitutions, elections, security sector reform, conflict, and trade). Along the way they share insights about what policies have worked, which ones need to be improved or discarded, and, more generally, what advanced democracies can do to further the cause of democratization in a globalizing world. In other words, they seek answers to the question, Is democracy exportable?

    • Coverage that includes political theory, comparative politics, and international relations
    • A comprehensive consideration of democratization and democracy promotion
    • Distinguished group of authors
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    Reviews & endorsements

    “This collection of searching essays by a group of distinguished policy-oriented scholars artfully combines contributions that reach deeply into history, philosophy, and culture with others that hew to tough-minded empiricism and practicality. Sobriety and optimism are present in equal measure, leading to telling insights about a basic question of our time: can well-intentioned outside actors affect the democratic destiny of countries around the world?”
    – Thomas Carothers, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

    “This book provides a long-overdue corrective to the neglect of the empirical underpinnings of an increasingly important dimension of foreign policy and international relations – efforts to export or promote democracy around the world. It is a creative and solid piece of scholarship that examines this issue from virtually all relevant perspectives.”
    – Richard Gunther, The Ohio State University

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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2009
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521748322
    • length: 316 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 155 x 27 mm
    • weight: 0.45kg
    • contains: 3 b/w illus. 1 table
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: promoting democracy Marc F. Plattner
    Part I. A Moral Imperative?:
    1. The morality of exporting democracy: an historical-philosophical perspective Thomas L. Pangle
    Part II. Structural Preconditions:
    2. Re-integrating the study of civil society and the state Sheri Berman
    3. Encountering culture M. Steven Fish
    4. Does democracy work in deeply divided societies? Daniel Chirot
    5. Democracy, civil society, and the problem of tolerance Adam Seligman
    Part III. Institutions and Processes:
    6. Electoral engineering in new democracies: can preferred electoral outcomes be engineered? Robert G. Moser
    7. Does it matter how a constitution is created? John Carey
    8. Building democratic armies Zoltan Barany
    9. Democratization, conflict, and trade Edward Mansfield and Jack Snyder
    10. Exporting democracy: does it work? Mitchell Seligson, Steven Finkel, and Aníbal Pérez-Liñán
    Conclusion Nancy Bermeo.

  • Editors

    Zoltan Barany, University of Texas, Austin
    fm.author_biographical_note1

    Robert G. Moser, University of Texas, Austin
    fm.author_biographical_note2

    Contributors

    Marc F. Plattner, Thomas L. Pangle, Sheri Berman, M. Steven Fish, Daniel Chirot, Adam Seligman, Robert G. Moser, John Carey, Zoltan Barany, Edward Mansfield, Jack Snyder, Mitchell Seligson, Steven Finkel, Aníbal Pérez-Liñán, Nancy Bermeo

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