Skip to content
Cart

Your Cart

×

You have 0 items in your cart.

Register Sign in Wishlist
Look Inside Cyberpsychology

Cyberpsychology
An Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction

$144.00 (P)

  • Date Published: August 2008
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521867382

$ 144.00 (P)
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
Paperback


Looking for an examination copy?

If you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an examination copy. To register your interest please contact collegesales@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Cyberpsychology is about humans and computers and the psychology of how they interact. Computers permeate nearly every human activity in the modern world and affect human behavior from the most basic sensory-motor interactions to the most complex cognitive and social processes. This book begins with a brief history of psychology and computers and a comparison of the human nervous system and the circuitry of a computer. A number of theories and models of human-computer interaction are presented, as well as research methods and techniques for usability testing. Following the typical contents of an introduction to psychology, the book then discusses sensation and perception, learning and memory, thinking and problem solving, language processing, individual differences, motivation and emotion, social relations, and abnormal behavior as they impact the human-computer interface. Finally, specific issues of artificial intelligence, assistive technologies, video games, and electronic education are presented. Cyberpsychology is the new psychology.

    • Chapters open with scenarios to illustrate the issues to be covered
    • Chapters include suggested exercises for the students
    • The book covers a very broad range of multidisciplinary topics and issues
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    “What does psychology have to contribute to our understanding of how people interact with computers? In Cyberpsychology, Kent Norman shares his thoughts on the psychology of human-computer interaction based on his more than 20 years of pioneering experience in the field. The book is broad in its coverage and grounded in the historical underpinnings of this important topic.”
    —Richard E. Mayer, Professor of Psychology and author of Multimedia Learning, University of California, Santa Barbara

    “This is a thought-provoking book about how human behavior has become increasingly linked to the technology that infuses so many aspects of our lives. Norman makes a strong argument that the study of human psychology must include the study of human-computer interaction.”
    —Marc M. Sebrechts, Department of Psychology, The Catholic University of America

    “Finally, a highly readable book that bridges psychology and computing in a fresh and appealing way. Cyberpsychology is a well-crafted blend of intriguing scenarios and thought-provoking examples. Norman’s unifying frameworks will engage students and professionals, while giving them new ways of thinking about their technology centered world. It uses the popular notions about the similarity between humans and computers, but wisely and clearly identifies the differences.”
    —Ben Shneiderman, University of Maryland

    “This book is an excellent contribution to the academic study of cyberspace as viewed through the lens of scientific psychology. It explores cyberpsychology from a very comprehensive perspective, covering all the major disciplines within psychology, ranging from issues concerning biology, sensation, and perception, all the way through interpersonal, social, and cultural issues. For anyone interested in a broad understanding of how psychological knowledge elucidates online behavior, this is a must read.”
    —John Suler, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Rider University, author of the online book "The Psychology of Cyberspace"

    "[...] The author presents a wide range of topics in an overview style, rather than a detailed synopsis of a few relevant topics. The focus is on people interacting with technology, rather than technology as a system. [...] nicely balanced history from tangential fields, [...]. [...] Norman introduces various contributors to the field , ranging from psychology's Wilhelm Wundt to communication's Claude Shannon. Each chapter includes an overview and summary section and begins with scenarios that prepare the reader for upcoming content. The text seems well researched as evidence by the numerous citations, [...]. Recommended."
    --B.G. Tucker, Faulkner University, Choice

    "...Written to cover all levels of ability and including helpful figures and illustrations, this book has sufficient depth to appeal to the most able students while the clear and accessible text, written by an experienced cyberpsychology researcher, will help students who find the material difficult. It will appeal to any student on an undergraduate psychology degree course as well as to medical students and those studying in related clinical professions such as nursing."
    --Thomas D. Parsons, PsycCRITIQUES [Vol. 54, Release 29, Article 8]

    See more reviews

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: August 2008
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521867382
    • length: 448 pages
    • dimensions: 261 x 186 x 28 mm
    • weight: 0.94kg
    • contains: 10 b/w illus. 37 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction: importance, implications, and historical perspectives
    2. Fundamentals: biological and technological bases
    3. Theoretical approaches: models and metaphors
    4. Research: modes and methods
    5. Sensory-motor interfaces: input and output
    6. Learning and memory, transfer and interference
    7. Cognitive psychology: thinking and problem solving
    8. Language and programming
    9. Individual differences: people, performance, and personality
    10. Motivation and emotion at the human-computer interface
    11. Interpersonal relations
    12. Abnormal behavior and cybertherapies
    13. Automation and artificial intelligence
    14. Assistive and augmentive technologies
    15. Media: games, entertainment, and education
    16. The future: the ultimate human-computer interface.

  • Author

    Kent L. Norman, University of Maryland, College Park
    Kent Norman received his doctorate from the University of Iowa in experimental psychology and is an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Maryland. He is the director of the Laboratory for Automation Psychology and Decision Processes (LAPDP) and is a founding member of the Human/Computer Interaction Laboratory (HCIL) in the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS). His research is on judgment and decision making and problem solving, particularly as they pertain to human-computer interaction and cognitive issues in interface design. Dr. Norman is the author of The Psychology of Menu Selection: Designing Cognitive Control at the Human/Computer Interface, and he is the developer of HyperCourseware™, a Web-based prototype for electronic educational environments reported on in his online text: Teaching in the Switched On Classroom (1999, http://lap.umd.edu/soc). He is co-author of the QUIS: The Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction, licensed by the university to corporate and government usability labs, and he is currently doing research on 'computer rage'. Dr Norman is the author or co-author of more than 80 journal articles and book chapters.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×