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Mind, Brain, and Education in Reading Disorders

Part of Cambridge Studies in Cognitive and Perceptual Development

Kurt W. Fischer, Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, Deborah Waber, Terrence W. Deacon, Verne S. Caviness, Albert M. Galaburda, Gordon F. Sherman, Maryanne Wolf, Jane Ashby, Robbie Case, L. Todd Rose, Samuel P. Rose, Robert W. Thatcher, Francine Benes, Juliana Paré-Blagoev, Frank H. Duffy, Martin H. Teicher, Jane Holmes Bernstein, Susan Brady, Benita A. Blachman, H. Gerry Taylor, Joseph K. Torgesen, Joseph C. Campione, Sandra Priest Rose, Rosalie Fink, David Rose
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  • Date Published: May 2012
  • availability: In stock
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107603226

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About the Authors
  • One of the key topics for establishing meaningful links between brain sciences and education is the development of reading. How does biology constrain learning to read? How does experience shape the development of reading skills? How does research on biology and behaviour connect to the ways that schools, teachers and parents help children learn to read, particularly in the face of disabilities that interfere with learning? This book addresses these questions and illuminates why reading disorders have been hard to identify, how recent research has established a firm base of knowledge about the cognitive neuroscience of reading problems and the learning tools for overcoming them, and finally, what the future holds for relating mind, brain and education to understanding reading difficulties. Connecting knowledge from neuroscience, genetics, cognitive science, child development, neuropsychology and education, this book will be of interest to both academic researchers and graduate students.

    • The first book to specifically relate mind, brain and education to reading disorders
    • Offers perspectives from a range of leading research contributors including neuroscientists, geneticists, and cognitive scientists, as well as educators
    • Chapter overviews help readers to see connections among diverse topics
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    Product details

    • Date Published: May 2012
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107603226
    • length: 352 pages
    • dimensions: 228 x 151 x 16 mm
    • weight: 0.57kg
    • contains: 37 b/w illus. 15 tables
    • availability: In stock
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. What Is Reading, and What Are Reading Disorders? Looking to Neuroscience, Evolution and Genetics:
    1. Towards a grounded synthesis of mind, brain and education for reading disorders: an introduction to the field and this book Kurt W. Fischer, Mary Helen Immordino-Yang and Deborah Waber
    2. An evolutionary perspective on reading and reading disorders Mary Helen Immordino-Yang and Terrence W. Deacon
    Essay: brain volume and the acquisition of adaptive capacities Verne S. Caviness
    3. The genetics of dyslexia: what is the phenotype? Albert M. Galaburda and Gordon F. Sherman
    Part II. Reading and the Growing Brain: Methodology and History:
    4. A brief history of time, phonology, and other explanations of developmental dyslexia Maryanne Wolf and Jane Ashby
    5. Approaches to behavioural and neurological research on learning disabilities: in search of a deeper synthesis Robbie Case
    6. Growth cycles of mind and brain: analyzing developmental pathways of learning disorders Kurt W. Fischer, L. Todd Rose and Samuel P. Rose
    Essay: cycles and gradients in development of the cortex Robert W. Thatcher
    7. Brain bases of reading disabilities Francine Benes and Juliana Paré-Blagoev
    8. The neural correlates of reading disorder: functional magnetic resonance imaging Juliana Paré-Blagoev
    9. Patterns of cortical connection in children with learning problems Frank H. Duffy
    Essay: the role of experience in brain development: adverse effects of childhood maltreatment Martin H. Teicher
    Part III. Watching Children Read:
    10. Finding common ground to promote dialogue and collaboration: using case material to jointly observe children's behaviour Jane Holmes Bernstein
    11. Analyzing the reading abilities of four boys: educational implications Susan Brady
    12. First impressions: what four readers can teach us Benita A. Blachman
    13. Analysis of reading disorders from a neuropsychological perspective H. Gerry Taylor
    14. An education/psychological perspective on the behaviors of three children with reading disabilities Joseph K. Torgesen
    Part IV. Reading Skills in the Long Term:
    15. The importance of comprehension in reading problems and instruction Joseph C. Campione
    Essay: bringing reading research to the trenches Sandra Priest Rose
    16. What successful adults with dyslexia teach educators about children Rosalie Fink
    17. Is a synthesis possible? Making doubly sure in research and application David Rose.

  • Editors

    Kurt W. Fischer, Harvard University, Massachusetts
    Kurt W. Fischer is Charles Warland Bigelow Professor of Education and Human Development and Director of the Mind, Brian and Education Program in the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University. He is founding president of the International Mind, Brain and Education Society and founding editor of the new journal Mind, Brain and Education.

    Jane Holmes Bernstein, The Children's Hospital, Boston
    Jane Holmes Bernstein is a developmental neuropsychologist who divides her time between teaching, writing and research responsibilities at the Children's Hospital Boston and the establishment of a National Child Development Program in Trinidad and Tobago.

    Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, University of Southern California
    Mary Helen Immordino-Yang studies the neuroscience of emotion and its relation to cognitive, linguistic and social development at the Brain and Creativity Institute, University of Southern California. She recently received her doctorate from the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University.

    Contributors

    Kurt W. Fischer, Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, Deborah Waber, Terrence W. Deacon, Verne S. Caviness, Albert M. Galaburda, Gordon F. Sherman, Maryanne Wolf, Jane Ashby, Robbie Case, L. Todd Rose, Samuel P. Rose, Robert W. Thatcher, Francine Benes, Juliana Paré-Blagoev, Frank H. Duffy, Martin H. Teicher, Jane Holmes Bernstein, Susan Brady, Benita A. Blachman, H. Gerry Taylor, Joseph K. Torgesen, Joseph C. Campione, Sandra Priest Rose, Rosalie Fink, David Rose

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