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The Cambridge Handbook of Violent Behavior and Aggression

$72.00 (P)

Part of Cambridge Handbooks in Psychology

Patrick H. Tolan, David P. Farrington, Terrie E. Moffitt, Soo Hyun Rhee, Irwin D. Waldman, Stephen Maxson, Andrew Canastar, Christopher J. Patrick, Edelyn Verona, Angela Scarpa, Adrian Raine, Royce Lee, Emil Coccaro, Jean R. Seguin, Patrick Sylvers, Scott O. Lilienfeld, Kenneth A. Dodge, Muchelle R. Sherrill, Nicki R. Crick, Jamie M. Ostrov, Yoshito Kawabata, Benajmin Lahey, Daniel Blonigen, Robert Krueger, Daniel Flannery, Mark Singer, Manfred van Dulmen, Jeff Kretschmar, Laura Belliston, George Pettit, Jacquelyn Mize, Michael Gottfredson, Frank Vitaro, Michael Boivin, Richard Tremblay, Scott Decker, Richard J. Gelles, Alexander T. Vazsonyi, Elizabeth Trejos-Castillo, Li Huang, Vangie A. Foshee, Rebecca Matthew, Dorothy Espelage, Stanley Wasserman, Mark S. Fleisher, Linda Dahlberg, Johan Van Wilsem, James C. Howell, Megan Q. Howell, Robert S. Agnew, Gary D. Gottfredson, Denise C. Gottfredson, L. Rowell Huesmann, Lucyana Kirwil, Mark Warr, Kevin J. Strom, Cynthia Irvin, Richard Heyman, Amy M. Smith Slep, Markus J. P. Kruesi, Gary Jensen, Jeff Kretschmar, Holly Foster, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Anne Martin, Jeffrey Fagan, Deanna Wilkinson, Garth Davies, Noel Card, Todd Little, Daniel Nagin, Bowen Paulle, Albert Farrell, Monique Vulin-Reynolds
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  • Date Published: September 2007
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9780521607858

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About the Authors
  • Violence is a complex behavior that manifests itself every day in acts of terrorism, through exposure in the media, and in our families and neighborhoods. Understanding the origins of violent behavior and aggression, its developmental course, and its impact on individuals and societies will allow us to develop appropriate preventative interventions and policies that will affect us in our everyday lives. This handbook is unique in its depth of coverage of violence and aggressive behavior, its multidisciplinary focus, and its presentation of cutting-edge research by the leading authors in the field.

    • Impressive breadth of coverage, including genetic research
    • Topics of violence and violence behavior covered from an international, cross-cultural perspective
    • Examines violence at muliple levels - individual, family, neighbourhood, cultural and across multiple perspectives -justice, education, public health
    Read more

    Reviews & endorsements

    "This handbook provides a comprehensive, multidisciplinary examination of current research and thinking about the issue of violence. It examines theoretical, policy, and research issues and provides an overview of aggressive and violent behavior..."
    ---Family Therapy [Vol 36, Number 2]

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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 2007
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9780521607858
    • length: 838 pages
    • dimensions: 251 x 184 x 37 mm
    • weight: 1.39kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction
    Part I. General Perspectives:
    1. Understanding violence
    2. Origins of violent behavior over the life span
    3. A review of research on the taxonomy of life-course persistent versus adolescence-limited antisocial behavior
    Part II. Biological Bases of Violence:
    4. Behavior-genetics of criminality and aggression
    5. The genetics of aggression in mice
    6. The psychophysiology of aggression: autonomic, electrocortical, and neuro-imaging findings
    7. Biosocial bases of violence
    8. Neurobiology of impulsive aggression: focus on serotonin and the orbitofrontal cortex
    9. The neuropsychology of violence
    10. The interaction of nature and nurture in antisocial behavior
    Part III. Individual Factors and Violence:
    11. Relational aggression and gender: an overview
    12. Personality dispositions and the development of violence and conduct problems
    13. Personality and violence: the unifying role of structural models of personality
    14. Exposure to violence, mental health and violent behavior
    15. Social-cognitive processes in the development of antisocial and violent behavior
    16. Self-control theory and criminal violence
    Part IV. Interpersonal Factors and Violent Behavior:
    17. Peers and violence: a two sided developmental perspective
    18. Youth gangs and violent behavior
    19. Family violence
    20. Youth violence across ethnic and national groups: comparisons of rates and developmental processes
    21. Adolescent dating abuse perpetration: a review of findings, methodological limitations, and suggestions for future research
    22. Social networks and violent behavior
    23. Public health and violence: moving forward in a global context
    24. Cross-national research on violent victimization
    25. Violent juvenile delinquency: changes, consequences, and implications
    26. Strain theory and violent behavior
    Part V. Contextual Factors and Violent Behavior:
    27. School violence
    28. Why observing violence increases the risk of violent behavior by the observer
    29. Violence and culture in the United States
    30. Terrorism as a form of violence
    31. Therapeutic treatment approaches to violent behavior
    32. Psychopharmacology of violence
    33. Social learning and violent behavior
    34. Substance use and violent behavior
    35. Poverty/ socioeconomic status and exposure to violence in the lives of children and adolescents
    36. Social contagion of violence
    Part VI. Methods for Studying Violent Behavior:
    37. Studying aggression with structural equation modeling
    38. Overview of a semi-parametric, group based approach for analyzing trajectories of development
    39. Relocating violence: practice and power in an emerging field of qualitative research
    Part VII. Looking Toward the Future:
    40. Violent behavior and the science of prevention
    41. New directions in research on violence: bridging science, practice and policy.

  • Resources for

    The Cambridge Handbook of Violent Behavior and Aggression

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  • Instructors have used or reviewed this title for the following courses

    • Adult Learners with Special Needs
    • Aggression and Violence
    • Biopsychology
    • Criminal Behavior
    • Epidemiology of violence
    • The Development of Antisocial Behavior
    • The Neuropsychology of Violence
    • Violence and Aggression
  • Editors

    Daniel J. Flannery, Kent State University, Ohio
    Dr Flannery is currently Professor of Justice Studies and Director of the Institute for the Study and Prevenetion of Violence at Kent State University. He was named a University Distinguished Scholar at KSU in 2006. He is a licensed clinical psychologist and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals of Cleveland. He is co-editor of Youth Violence: Precention, Intervention, and Social Policy (1999) and author of Violence and Mental Health in Every Day Life: Prevention and Intervention for Children and Adolescents (2006). His primary areas of research are in youth violence prevention, the link between violence and mental health, and program evaluation. He received his PhD in 1991 in Clinical-Child Psychology from the Ohio State University. His previous appointments were as Assistant Professor of Family Studies at the University of Arizona, and as Associate Professor of Child Psychiatry at Case Western. He has published over 100 empirical articles and book chapters on youth violence prevention, delinquency, and parent-adolescent relations. He has also generated over $15 million in external support for his research. He has served as a consultant to various local and national organizations including the US Departments of Justice and Education, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Crime Prevention Council, and the National Resource Center for Safe Schools.

    Alexander T. Vazsonyi, Auburn University, Alabama
    Dr Vazsonyi is currently the Professor of Human Development and Family Studies at Auburn University in Alabama. He has been a Fulbright Fellow, an Editor at the Journal of Early Adolescence, a Representative to the United Nations from Geneva and Vienna, and put on the Economic and Social Council for the American Society of Criminology. He is a reviewer for grants for the National Science Foundation, SAMHSA, the Department of Education, and reviews for over twenty journals. He has a particular interest in the application of a cross cultural and cross national comparative method of human development and violent behavior.

    Irwin D. Waldman, Emory University, Atlanta
    Dr Waldman is currently a Professor of Psychology at Emory University, Atlanta. He is a clinical psychologist with developmental interests who examines the genetic and environmental etiology of disruptive behavior disorders in childhood and adolescence. His current research explores the role of candidate genes in the development of externalizing behavior problems, as well as genetic and environmental influences on comorbidity and on the links between normal variation in symptoms and in personality in the general population.

    Contributors

    Patrick H. Tolan, David P. Farrington, Terrie E. Moffitt, Soo Hyun Rhee, Irwin D. Waldman, Stephen Maxson, Andrew Canastar, Christopher J. Patrick, Edelyn Verona, Angela Scarpa, Adrian Raine, Royce Lee, Emil Coccaro, Jean R. Seguin, Patrick Sylvers, Scott O. Lilienfeld, Kenneth A. Dodge, Muchelle R. Sherrill, Nicki R. Crick, Jamie M. Ostrov, Yoshito Kawabata, Benajmin Lahey, Daniel Blonigen, Robert Krueger, Daniel Flannery, Mark Singer, Manfred van Dulmen, Jeff Kretschmar, Laura Belliston, George Pettit, Jacquelyn Mize, Michael Gottfredson, Frank Vitaro, Michael Boivin, Richard Tremblay, Scott Decker, Richard J. Gelles, Alexander T. Vazsonyi, Elizabeth Trejos-Castillo, Li Huang, Vangie A. Foshee, Rebecca Matthew, Dorothy Espelage, Stanley Wasserman, Mark S. Fleisher, Linda Dahlberg, Johan Van Wilsem, James C. Howell, Megan Q. Howell, Robert S. Agnew, Gary D. Gottfredson, Denise C. Gottfredson, L. Rowell Huesmann, Lucyana Kirwil, Mark Warr, Kevin J. Strom, Cynthia Irvin, Richard Heyman, Amy M. Smith Slep, Markus J. P. Kruesi, Gary Jensen, Jeff Kretschmar, Holly Foster, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Anne Martin, Jeffrey Fagan, Deanna Wilkinson, Garth Davies, Noel Card, Todd Little, Daniel Nagin, Bowen Paulle, Albert Farrell, Monique Vulin-Reynolds

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