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Wellbeing in Developing Countries

Wellbeing in Developing Countries
From Theory to Research

$129.00 (C)

Ian Gough, J. Allister McGregor, Laura Camfield, Des Gasper, Richard Ryan, Aislinn Sapp, Sabina Alkire, Geoff Wood, Mark McGillivray, Sarah White, Mark Ellison, Tony Bebbington, Leonith Hinojosa-Valencia, Diego Munoz, Rafael Enrique Rojas Lizarazú, James Copestake, Monika Bullinger, Silke Schmidt, Valerie Møller, Mariano Rojas, Philippa Bevan
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  • Date Published: June 2007
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521857512

$ 129.00 (C)
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About the Authors
  • In a world where many experience unprecedented levels of wellbeing, chronic poverty remains a major concern for many developing countries and the international community. Conventional frameworks for understanding development and poverty have focused on money, commodities and economic growth. This 2007 book challenges these conventional approaches and contributes to a new paradigm for development centred on human wellbeing. Poor people are not defined solely by their poverty and a wellbeing approach provides a better means of understanding how people become and stay poor. It examines three perspectives: ideas of human functioning, capabilities and needs; the analysis of livelihoods and resource use; and research on subjective wellbeing and happiness. A range of international experts from psychology, economics, anthropology, sociology, political science and development evaluate the state-of-the-art in understanding wellbeing from these perspectives. This book establishes a new strategy and methodology for researching wellbeing that can influence policy.

    • International experts from a wide range of disciplines set out a strategy and methodology for researching wellbeing
    • Challenges the dominant view of wellbeing and development being based on money and goods
    • Will appeal to researchers, academics and graduate students in sociology, social policy, politics, psychology, economics, research methods and development studies
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    Reviews & endorsements

    Review of the hardback: 'This is a beautifully constructed and apposite book for those seeking hope amid today's economic crisis and who work in development from any discipline or background. It challenges the conventional wisdom of money, commodities and economic growth as our main ways of understanding development and poverty and could have as much impact on development as Lanyard has done for the relationship between happiness and wealth. It is written by those and for those seeking a more inclusive model for understanding how people in developing countries see themselves and the possibilities of change.' Patricia d'Ardenne, Chartist

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    Product details

    • Date Published: June 2007
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521857512
    • length: 424 pages
    • dimensions: 229 x 152 x 27 mm
    • weight: 0.79kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction:
    1. Theorising wellbeing in international development Ian Gough, J. Allister McGregor and Laura Camfield
    Part I. Human Needs and Human Wellbeing:
    2. Conceptualising human needs and wellbeing Des Gasper
    3. Basic psychological needs: a self-determination theory perspective on the promotion of wellness across development and cultures Richard Ryan and Aislinn Sapp
    4. Measuring freedoms alongside wellbeing Sabina Alkire
    5. Using security to indicate wellbeing Geoff Wood
    6. Towards a measure of non-economic wellbeing achievement Mark McGillivray
    Part II. Resources: From Material to Cultural:
    7. Wellbeing, livelihoods and resources in social practice Sarah White and Mark Ellison
    8. Livelihoods and resource accessing in the Andes: desencuentros in theory and practice Tony Bebbington, Leonith Hinojosa-Valencia, Diego Munoz and Rafael Enrique Rojas Lizarazú
    9. Poverty and exclusion, resources and relationships: theorising the links between economic and social development James Copestake
    Part III. Quality of Life and Subjective Wellbeing:
    10. Cross-cultural quality of life assessment: approaches and experiences from the health care field Monika Bullinger and Silke Schmidt
    11. Researching quality of life in a developing country: lessons from the South African case Valerie Møller
    12. The complexity of wellbeing: a life-satisfaction conception and a domains-of-life approach Mariano Rojas
    Conclusion. Researching Wellbeing:
    13. Researching wellbeing across the disciplines: some key intellectual problems and ways forward Philippa Bevan
    14. Researching wellbeing: from concepts to methodology J. Allister McGregor.

  • Editors

    Ian Gough, University of Bath

    J. Allister McGregor, University of Bath

    Contributors

    Ian Gough, J. Allister McGregor, Laura Camfield, Des Gasper, Richard Ryan, Aislinn Sapp, Sabina Alkire, Geoff Wood, Mark McGillivray, Sarah White, Mark Ellison, Tony Bebbington, Leonith Hinojosa-Valencia, Diego Munoz, Rafael Enrique Rojas Lizarazú, James Copestake, Monika Bullinger, Silke Schmidt, Valerie Møller, Mariano Rojas, Philippa Bevan

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