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Early Responses to Renaissance Drama
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Details

  • 8 b/w illus.
  • Page extent: 356 pages
  • Size: 229 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.52 kg
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Paperback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521117203)

  • Also available in Hardback
  • Published July 2009

Manufactured on demand: supplied direct from the printer

$43.99 (C)
Early Responses to Renaissance Drama
Cambridge University Press
978-0-521-85843-4 - EARLY RESPONSES TO RENAISSANCE DRAMA - by Charles Whitney
Table of Contents





Contents

List of illustrationspage ix
Acknowledgmentsx

Introduction1

PART I TAMBURLAINE, SIR JOHN, AND THE FORMATION OF
EARLY MODERN RECEPTION
15


1Tamburlaine intervenes17
The scandal of sadomasochism: liberating the Protestant aesthetic20
The scourge of God, here and now30
Emblems for relentless forces37
Aftermath: idealization and travesty52
From Tamburlaine to Hamlet61

2Versions of Sir John70
The Oldcastle controversy73
The orature of Sir John82
Carnival and Lent91
Between Carnival and modern aesthetics103

PART II  AUDIENCES ENTERTAINING PLAYS113

3Playgoers in the theatrum mundi to 1617115
John Davies of Hereford and the authority of the audience116
The Inns of Court and the culture of playgoing123
Playgoing, poetry, and love-making: Edmund Spenser and Robert Tofte132
Simon Forman and the uses of the theatre147

4Common understanders161
Service workers and the interpretive authority of labor162
Out of service and in the playhouse: Richard Norwood
 and Early Response to Dr. Faustus
169
“Vagrant” youth: apprentices, craft servants, and others185
A note on fishwives195
Low audiences, pluralistic theatre196

5Playgoing and play-reading gentlewomen201
The theatre of meditation: Amelia Lanyer and the tragic Cleopatra204
Reprobation as resistance: Joan Drake and Jonson’s Ananias215
Anne Murray Halkett and the theatre of Cavalier life224
Private shows: Dorothy Osborne and the courtship of Richard III233

6Jonson and Shakespeare: living monuments and
public spheres
241
The uses of Jonson242
Milton’s Shakespeare: theatres of God and man256

Notes271
Bibliography309
Index332


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