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Necessity, Proportionality and the Use of Force by States
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Details

  • Page extent: 288 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.59 kg

Library of Congress

  • Dewey number: 341.6
  • Dewey version: 22
  • LC Classification: KZ6385 .G368 2004
  • LC Subject headings:
    • War (International law)
    • Necessity (International law)
    • Proportionality in law

Library of Congress Record

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Hardback

 (ISBN-13: 9780521837521 | ISBN-10: 0521837529)

Manufactured on demand: supplied direct from the printer

$149.00 (C)

Against the background of recent armed conflicts under the United Nations Charter, this 2004 book considers how the requirements of proportionality and necessity operate as legal restraints on the forceful actions of States. It also examines the relationship between proportionality in the law on the use of force and international humanitarian law.

Contents

Acknowledgments; Table of cases; List of abbreviations; Preface; 1. The place of necessity and proportionality in restraints on the forceful actions of states; 2. Necessity, proportionality and the forceful actions of states prior to the adoption of the United Nations Charter in 1945; 3. Proportionality and combatants in modern international humanitarian law; 4. Proportionality and civilians in modern international humanitarian law; 5. Necessity, proportionality and the unilateral use of force in the era of the United Nations Charter; 6. Necessity, proportionality and the United Nations system: collective actions involving the use of force; Bibliography; Index.

Review

"Necessity, Proportionality and the Use of Force by States is essential reading for anyone concerned with the international law on the use of force. It provides detailed analysis not found elsewhere on two of the most important use of force principles in the canon, necessity and proportionality." - Mary Ellen O'Connel, Notre Dame Law School, The American Journal of International Law

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