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The Cambridge Companion to Religion and Terrorism
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  • Page extent: 278 pages
  • Size: 228 x 152 mm
  • Weight: 0.41 kg
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Paperback

 (ISBN-13: 9781316505625)

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$29.99 (G)

There is currently much discussion regarding the causes of terrorist acts, as well as the connection between terrorism and religion. Terrorism is attributed either to religious 'fanaticism' or, alternately, to political and economic factors, with religion more or less dismissed as a secondary factor. The Cambridge Companion to Religion and Terrorism examines this complex relationship between religion and terrorism phenomenon through a collection of essays freshly written for this volume. Bringing varying approaches to the topic, from the theoretical to the empirical, the Companion includes an array of subjects, such as radicalization, suicide bombing, and rational choice, as well as specific case studies. The result is a richly textured collection that prompts readers to critically consider the cluster of phenomena that we have come to refer to as 'terrorism,' and terrorism's relationship with the similarly problematic set of phenomena that we call 'religion.'

Contents

1. Does religion cause terrorism? Mark Juergensmeyer; 2. Religion, violence, nonsense, and power William T. Cavanaugh; 3. Discounting religion in the explanation of homegrown terrorism: a critique Lorne L. Dawson; 4. Religion, radicalization, and the causes of terrorism Tom Mills and David Miller; 5. The role of the devoted actor in war, revolution, and terrorism Scott Atran; 6. Girard on apocalypse and terrorism Espen Dahl; 7. Rational choice and religious terrorism: its bases, applications, and future directions Stephen Nemeth; 8. Terror as sacrificial ritual? A discussion of (neo-) Durkheimian approaches to suicide bombing Lorenz Graitl; 9. Imitations of terror: applying a retro style of analysis to the religion-terrorism nexus James R. Lewis; 10. The LTTE: a non-religious, political, martial movement for establishing the right of self-determination of Īlattamils Peter Schalk; 11. The role of religion in al-Qaeda's violence Pieter Nanninga; 12. Meanings of savagery: terror, religion, and the Islamic State Pieter Nanninga; 13. Where's Charlie? The discourse of religious violence in France post 7/1 2015 Per-Erik Nilsson; 14. Understanding the threat of the Islamic State in contemporary Kyrgyzstan Meerim Aitkulova; 15. Terror and the screen: keeping the relationship of good and bad virtual Christopher Hartney; 16. Understanding Falun Gong's martyrdom strategy as spiritual terrorism James R. Lewis and Nicole S. Ruskell.

Contributors

Mark Juergensmeyer, William T. Cavanaugh, Lorne L. Dawson, Tom Mills, David Miller, Scott Atran, Espen Dahl, Stephen Nemeth, Lorenz Graitl, James R. Lewis, Peter Schalk, Pieter Nanninga, Per-Erik Nilsson, Meerim Aitkulova, Christopher Hartney, Nicole S. Ruskell

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