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Apprenticeship in Early Modern Europe

Apprenticeship in Early Modern Europe

$99.99

Maarten Prak, Patrick Wallis, Joel Mokyr, Victoria López Barahona, José Nieto Sanchez, Beatrice Zucca Micheletto, Anna Bellavitis, Riccardo Cella, Giovanni Colavizza, Georg Stöger, Reinhold Reith, Merja Uotila, Ruben Schalk, Bert De Munck, Raoul De Kerf, Annelies De Bie, Clare Crowston, Claire Lemercier
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  • Publication planned for: February 2020
  • availability: Not yet published - available from February 2020
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781108496926

$ 99.99
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About the Authors
  • This is the first comparative and comprehensive account of occupational training before the Industrial Revolution. Apprenticeship was a critical part of human capital formation, and, because of this, it has a central role to play in understanding economic growth in the past. At the same time, it was a key stage in the lives of many people, whose access to skills and experience of learning were shaped by the guilds that trained them. The local and national studies contained in this volume bring together the latest research into how skills training worked across Europe in an era before the emergence of national school systems. These essays, written to a common agenda and drawing on major new datasets, systematically outline the features of what amounted to a European-wide system of skills education, and provide essential insights into a key institution of economic and social history.

    • Identifies the underlying features of apprenticeship across Europe
    • Has a wide-ranging geographical scope, with chapters covering Spain, Italy, Germany, Finland, the Netherlands, Belgium, England and France
    • Offers a major contribution to debates about the role of training in economic development and economic divergence
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    Product details

    • Publication planned for: February 2020
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781108496926
    • dimensions: 228 x 152 mm
    • contains: 16 b/w illus. 6 maps 30 tables
    • availability: Not yet published - available from February 2020
  • Table of Contents

    Introduction: apprenticeship in early modern Europe Maarten Prak and Patrick Wallis
    1. The economics of apprenticeship Joel Mokyr
    2. Apprenticeship in early modern Madrid Victoria López Barahona and José Nieto Sanchez
    3. A large 'umbrella': patterns of apprenticeship in eighteenth-century Turin Beatrice Zucca Micheletto
    4. Apprenticeship in early modern Venice Anna Bellavitis, Riccardo Cella and Giovanni Colavizza
    5. Actors and practices of German apprenticeship, fifteenth-nineteenth centuries Georg Stöger and Reinhold Reith
    6. Rural artisans' apprenticeship practices in early modern Finland (1700–1850) Merja Uotila
    7. Apprenticeships with and without guilds: the Northern Netherlands Ruben Schalk
    8. Apprenticeship in the Southern Netherlands, c.1400–c.1800 Bert De Munck, Raoul De Kerf and Annelies De Bie
    9. Apprenticeship in England Patrick Wallis
    10. Surviving the end of the guilds: apprenticeship in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century France Clare Crowston and Claire Lemercier
    Conclusion: European apprenticeship Maarten Prak and Patrick Wallis.

  • Editors

    Maarten Prak, Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
    Maarten Prak is Professor of Social and Economic History at Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands. His wide collection of writings includes Citizens without Nations: Urban Citizenship in Europe and the World, c.1000–1789 (Cambridge, 2018).

    Patrick Wallis, London School of Economics and Political Science
    Patrick Wallis is Professor of Economic History at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His many publications include Medicine and the Market in England and Its Colonies, c. 1450-c. 1850 (2007), co-edited with Mark S. R. Jenner, and he currently edits the Economic History Review.

    Contributors

    Maarten Prak, Patrick Wallis, Joel Mokyr, Victoria López Barahona, José Nieto Sanchez, Beatrice Zucca Micheletto, Anna Bellavitis, Riccardo Cella, Giovanni Colavizza, Georg Stöger, Reinhold Reith, Merja Uotila, Ruben Schalk, Bert De Munck, Raoul De Kerf, Annelies De Bie, Clare Crowston, Claire Lemercier

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