Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist

Markets and Measurements in Nineteenth-Century Britain

$113.00

Part of Cambridge Studies in Economic History - Second Series

  • Date Published: October 2012
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107023338

$ 113.00
Hardback

Add to cart Add to wishlist

Other available formats:
eBook


Looking for an evaluation copy?

This title is not currently available for evaluation. However, if you are interested in the title for your course we can consider offering an evaluation copy. To register your interest please contact asiamktg@cambridge.org providing details of the course you are teaching.

Description
Product filter button
Description
Contents
Resources
Courses
About the Authors
  • Measurements are a central institutional component of markets and economic exchange. By the nineteenth century, the measurement system in Britain was desperately in need of revision: a multiplicity of measurement standards, proliferation of local or regional weights and measures, and a confusing array of measurement practices made everyday measurements unreliable. Aashish Velkar uncovers how metrology and economic logic alone failed to make 'measurements' reliable, and discusses the importance of localised practices in shaping trust in them. Markets and Measurements in Nineteenth-Century Britain steers away from the traditional explanations of measurement reliability based on the standardisation and centralisation of metrology; the focus is on changing measurement practices in local economic contexts. Detailed case studies from the industrial revolution suggest that such practices were path-dependent and 'anthropocentric'. Therefore, whilst standardised metrology may have improved precision, it was localised practices that determined the reliability and trustworthiness of measurements in economic contexts.

    • An economic and social history of measurements in the nineteenth century which demonstrates the fundamental place measurements have in economic exchanges
    • Detailed case studies reveal local market practices
    • Distinguishes between 'the science of metrology' as a centralised code, and 'the practice of measurement' as a localised activity
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: October 2012
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107023338
    • length: 274 pages
    • dimensions: 236 x 160 x 18 mm
    • weight: 0.52kg
    • contains: 14 b/w illus. 13 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Markets and measurements: an introduction
    2. Inching towards the meter: measurements, metrology and reform
    3. Mensuration and local measurement practices
    4. Governance and regulation: standardising measurements in the London coal trade (c.1830)
    5. Competition, cooperation and standardisation: uniform measurements in British wire industry (c.1880)
    6. Globalisation, commodity grading and quality measurements in nineteenth-century wheat markets
    7. 'Man is the measure of all things': conclusions and implications.

  • Author

    Aashish Velkar, University of Manchester
    Aashish Velkar is a lecturer in International Business at the University of Sussex. Prior to entering academia, Aashish held managerial positions at international consulting firms in South Asia.

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×