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The Cambridge Companion to Boccaccio

$91.99

Part of Cambridge Companions to Literature

Guyda Armstrong, Rhiannon Daniels, Stephen J. Milner, Beatrice Arduini, Pier Massimo Forni, David Lummus, F. Regina Psaki, Gur Zak, Tobias Gittes, Marilyn Migiel, Brian Richardson, Cormac Ó Cuilleanáin, Massimo Riva
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  • Date Published: July 2015
  • availability: Available
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107014350

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About the Authors
  • Incorporating the most recent research by scholars in Italy, the UK, Ireland and North America, this collection of essays foregrounds Boccaccio's significance as a pre-eminent scholar and mediator of the classical and vernacular traditions, whose innovative textual practices confirm him as a figure of equal standing to Petrarch and Dante. Situating Boccaccio and his works in their cultural contexts, the Companion introduces a wide range of his texts, paying close attention to his formal innovations, elaborate voicing strategies, and the tensions deriving from his position as a medieval author who places women at the centre of his work. Four chapters are dedicated to different aspects of his masterpiece, the Decameron, while particular attention is paid to the material forms of his works: from his own textual strategies as the shaper of his own and others' literary legacies, to his subsequent editorial history, and translation into other languages and media.

    • A comprehensive and revisionary assessment that positions Boccaccio as a key cultural mediator equal to Dante and Petrarch
    • Focuses particular attention on Boccaccio's masterpiece Decameron, but also discusses the material production of his texts, his innovative textual practices, and the place of women at the centre of his work
    • Includes the most up-to-date list of Boccaccio's autograph manuscripts in any English-language publication
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    Reviews & endorsements

    '… this new book enlightens readers from different disciplines and backgrounds about the works of Boccaccio. It offers a picture of him at the crossroads of media, political commitments, and a literary career, underlines his modernity, and explains why his genius continues to live - even through media he had no opportunity, for reasons of chronology, to exploit …' Johnny L. Bertolio, Renaissance and Reformation

    'These essays, all well and clearly written, knowledgeable and thoroughly grounded in up-to-date scholarship, combine a quick review of previous work on their topics with an offering of valuable new insights and suggestions for diverse approaches to Boccaccio's texts. Both readable by students and useful to scholars, this will long remain a necessary and worthwhile volume for anyone venturing into Boccaccio studies.' Janet Levarie Smarr, Speculum

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    Product details

    • Date Published: July 2015
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9781107014350
    • length: 298 pages
    • dimensions: 235 x 157 x 21 mm
    • weight: 0.57kg
    • contains: 6 b/w illus.
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Locating Boccaccio:
    1. Boccaccio as cultural mediator Guyda Armstrong, Rhiannon Daniels and Stephen J. Milner
    2. Boccaccio and his desk Beatrice Arduini
    3. Boccaccio's narrators and audiences Rhiannon Daniels
    Part II. Literary Forms and Narrative Voices:
    4. The Decameron and narrative form Pier Massimo Forni
    5. The Decameron and Boccaccio's poetics David Lummus
    6. Boccaccio's Decameron and the semiotics of the everyday Stephen J. Milner
    7. Voicing gender in the Decameron F. Regina Psaki
    Part III. Boccaccio's Literary Contexts:
    8. Boccaccio and Dante Guyda Armstrong
    9. Boccaccio and Petrarch Gur Zak
    10. Boccaccio and humanism Tobias Gittes
    11. Boccaccio and women Marilyn Migiel
    Part IV. Transmission and Adaptation:
    12. Editing Boccaccio Brian Richardson
    13. Translating Boccaccio Cormac Ó Cuilleanáin
    14. Boccaccio beyond the text Massimo Riva
    Guide to further reading.

  • Editors

    Guyda Armstrong, University of Manchester
    Guyda Armstrong is Senior Lecturer in Italian at the University of Manchester and is author of The English Boccaccio: A History in Books (2013).

    Rhiannon Daniels, University of Bristol
    Rhiannon Daniels is Lecturer in Italian at the University of Bristol and is author of Boccaccio and the Book: Production and Reading in Italy, 1340–1520 (2009).

    Stephen J. Milner, University of Manchester
    Stephen J. Milner is Serena Professor of Italian at the University of Manchester. He is co-editor, with Catherine Lèglu, of The Erotics of Consolation: Distance and Desire in the Middle Ages (2008) and editor of At the Margins: Minority Groups in Premodern Italy (2005).

    Contributors

    Guyda Armstrong, Rhiannon Daniels, Stephen J. Milner, Beatrice Arduini, Pier Massimo Forni, David Lummus, F. Regina Psaki, Gur Zak, Tobias Gittes, Marilyn Migiel, Brian Richardson, Cormac Ó Cuilleanáin, Massimo Riva

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