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The Southern Marches of Imperial Ethiopia

The Southern Marches of Imperial Ethiopia
Essays in History and Social Anthropology

Part of African Studies

Donald Donham, Alessandro Triulzi, Uri Almagor, Wendy James, David Turton, Charles W. McCellan, Peter P. Garretson, Douglas H. Johnson
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  • Date Published: September 1986
  • availability: Unavailable - out of print July 1994
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9780521322379

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  • This international collection of essays offers a unique approach to the understanding of imperial Ethiopia, out of which the present state was created by the 1974 revolution. After the 1880s, Abyssinia, under Menilek II, expanded its ancient heartland to incorporate vast new territories to the south. Here, for the first time, these regions are treated as an integral part of the empire. The book opens with an interpretation of nineteenth-century Abyssinia as an African political economy, rather than as a variant on European feudalism, and with an account of the north's impact on peoples of the new south. Case studies from the southern regions follow four by historians and four by anthropologists, each examining aspects of the relationship between imperial rule and local society. In revealing the region's diversity and the relationship of the periphery to the centre, the volume illuminates some of the problems faced by post-revolutionary Ethiopia.

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    Product details

    • Date Published: September 1986
    • format: Hardback
    • isbn: 9780521322379
    • length: 324 pages
    • dimensions: 228 x 152 x 22 mm
    • weight: 0.58kg
    • availability: Unavailable - out of print July 1994
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. The making of an imperial state:
    1. Old Abyssinia and the new Ethiopian empire: themes in social history Donald Donham
    Part II. Renegotiating power and authority:
    2. Nekemte and Addis Abeba: dilemmas of provincial rule Alessandro Triulzi
    3. From ritual kings to Ethiopian landlords in Maale Donald Donham
    4. Institutionalizing a fringe periphery: Dassanetch-Amhara relations Uri Almagor
    Part III. Reorienting kinship and identity:
    5. Lifelines: exchange marriage among the Gumuz Wendy James
    6. A problem of domination at the periphery: the Kwegu and the Mursi David Turton
    Part IV. Expanding tribute and trade:
    7. Coffee in centre-periphery relations: Gedeo in the early twentieth century Charles W. McCellan
    8. Vicious cycles: ivory, slaves, and arms on the new Maji frontier Peter P. Garretson
    9. On the Nilotic frontier: imperial Ethiopia in the southern Sudan, 1898–1936 Douglas H. Johnson
    Epilogue Wendy James.

  • Authors

    Donald Donham

    Wendy James

    Contributors

    Donald Donham, Alessandro Triulzi, Uri Almagor, Wendy James, David Turton, Charles W. McCellan, Peter P. Garretson, Douglas H. Johnson

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