Skip to content
Register Sign in Wishlist
The Iraq-Kuwait Dispute 1830–1994

The Iraq-Kuwait Dispute 1830–1994
7 Volume Hardback Set Including Boxed Maps

£2,450.00

Cambridge Archive Editions
  • Date Published: November 1994
  • availability: Temporarily unavailable - available from TBC
  • format: Mixed media product
  • isbn: 9781852075859

£2,450.00
Mixed media product

Temporarily unavailable - available from TBC
Notify me when available Add to wishlist
Description
Product filter button
Description
Additional Information
Contents
Resources
About the Authors
  • For the first four volumes the Editor's aim has been to guide the reader through all the relevant, publicly available documents which have shaped the evolution of the international boundary between Iraq and Kuwait, from Ottoman times to the recent operations of the United Nations. In volumes 5 to 6 of the collection attention is paid to the emerging international status of Kuwait, Britain's role in this process and Ottoman and Iraqi claims to the sovereignty or suzerainty of Kuwait. This publication provides primary source materials relating to the history of the two separate, and seemingly contradictory, territorial claims that successive Iraqi governments have maintained with respect to the state of Kuwait and its territory. Expert and detailed commentary is passed on the significance of each phase in the documented history of the Iraq-Kuwait dispute. The contents lists also cross-reference the maps included within the map box.

    • Facsimile collections of key documents from archive sources
    • Previously unknown or fragmented material now available in a coherent collection
    • Carefully selected and edited for maximum value to researchers and scholars
    Read more

    Customer reviews

    Not yet reviewed

    Be the first to review

    Review was not posted due to profanity

    ×

    , create a review

    (If you're not , sign out)

    Please enter the right captcha value
    Please enter a star rating.
    Your review must be a minimum of 12 words.

    How do you rate this item?

    ×

    Product details

    • Date Published: November 1994
    • Format: Mixed media product
    • Isbn: 9781852075859
    • Length: 4000 pages
    • Dimensions: 275 x 198 x 150 mm
    • Weight: 10.5kg
    • Availability: Temporarily unavailable - available from TBC
    • Paper: Printed on acid-free paper
    • Binding: Library bindings with gilt finish
    • Resume

      The Arabian Geopolitics series sets out to examine the key issues in the political evolution of strategic regions of the Arabian Peninsula. It explores the historical background to contemporary developments in political and territorial authority. It highlights the interaction of inter-state relations and claims, traditional trade and tribal activity and the extent to which natural resources dictate national claims.

      This publication provides primary source materials relating to the history of the two separate, and seemingly contradictory, territorial claims that successive Iraqi governments have maintained with respect to the state of Kuwait and its territory.

      For the first four volumes the Editor's aim has been to guide the reader through all the relevant, publicly-available documents which have shaped the evolution of the international boundary between Iraq and Kuwait, from Ottoman times to the recent operations of the United Nations. In volumes 5 to 6 of the collection attention is paid to the emerging international status of Kuwait, Britain's role in this process and Ottoman and Iraqi claims to the sovereignty or suzerainty of Kuwait. Within the lengthy contents lists which preface each volume of text, expert and detailed commentary is passed on the significance of each phase in the documented history of the Iraq-Kuwait dispute. These contents lists also cross-reference the maps included within the map box.

    • Historical Overview

      The territorial dispute between Iraq and Kuwait had continued for half a century before the United Nations intervened to settle the issue in the wake of Iraq's occupation of Kuwait during the late summer of 1990 and the removal of Iraqi forces from the emirate during the following winter. Ever since Britain (on behalf of Kuwait) submitted its first detailed proposal to Iraq for the demarcation of the vaguely-defined 1932 land boundary, successive Baghdad governments have tended to insist that Kuwait must first concede its ownership of the islands of Warba and Bubiyan to varying degrees if it wanted a demarcated land boundary. Concessions were needed over the islands, or so it was argued, so that Iraq might improve its meagre access to Gulf waters and exercise full control over the navigational approaches to the Khor Zubair, on which it has consistently striven to construct an alternative dry-cargo port to Basra. The foundation stone for the modern Iraq port of Umm Qasr was eventually laid in 1961.

      Just as consistently during the same period, Kuwait has argued that Iraq would need to agree to and implement demarcation of the land boundary before it would even consider making any concessions over the islands, and even then it was only the possible lease of Warba that was on the agenda. Despite the suggestion of various initiatives over the years, the dispute was never freed from this deadlocked pattern, notwithstanding Iraq's commitment in an agreement with Kuwait of October 1963 to formally recognise the independence of Kuwait within its boundaries (i.e., the vague ones of 1932) for the first time since Iraqi independence late during 1932.
      As a result of Iraq's disastrous move on Kuwait during 1990, the impasse of the border was broken in the following manner. The United Nations would oblige both Iraq and Kuwait to recognise the existing border. Kuwait's long-standing desire for the demarcation of the existing boundary with its northern Arab neighbour has finally been satisfied, albeit at a terrible cost, without the old Iraqi precondition of a trade-off on the islands issue having had to be made.
      When presenting the final report of the United Nations Iraq-Kuwait Boundary Demarcation Commission to the Security Council in May 1993, the UN Secretary-General expressed the belief that settlement and demarcation of this troublesome territorial limit would have 'a beneficial effect on the restoration of international peace and security in the area concerned...' However, the problem which remains for Iraq is that which has persisted for the last six decades - to reconcile itself to its minuscule shoreline on the Gulf and to rid itself of its persistent negative consciousness concerning this disadvantageous geographical position. For the future security of the northern Gulf it is ultimately much more important that Iraq loses this negative consciousness than merely achieves demarcated boundaries with Kuwait.

      Recent events as well as the historical record suggest that the last may not have been heard of Iraq-Kuwait territorial disputes. This appears to be the first time on record that the United Nations has intervened to impose a territorial settlement between member states. Presumably at some point the United Nations peacekeeping force currently deployed along the border will depart and responsibility for the management of the borderlands will return to the two governments on either side of the political divide. Perhaps only at that point will we begin to learn whether Iraq can live with its limited access to the Gulf and whether its historical restlessness over this question has been calmed.

    • Documentary Importance

      This publication provides primary source materials relating to the history of the two separate, and seemingly contradictory, territorial claims that successive Iraqi governments have maintained with respect to the state of Kuwait and its territory. The claim maintained with great consistency since the late 1930s is that Kuwait should make territorial concessions to ease Iraq's access to Gulf waters. Much more dramatic, though only intermittently maintained, is that Kuwait should be incorporated within the Iraqi state to reflect its former position as a qadha of the Ottoman wilayat of Basra. Six volumes of documents comprise items selected from the relevant archives of the various departments of the British Government, the Government of India, the State Department of the United States and the United Nations. The map box contains maps produced by or for the Government of India, the Foreign Office, the Admiralty, the British Military Survey and the United Nations Iraq-Kuwait Boundary Demarcation Commission.

      The collection of documents is particularly noteworthy for the following reasons. It represents the first serious effort to examine the evolution of the maritime jurisdiction of Iraq and Kuwait in the northern Gulf in the critical post-war (1945-1963) period (see volumes 2-4). Since maritime boundaries have still to be negotiated between Iraq and Iran and Kuwait and Iran and the boundary announced by the United Nations between Iraq and Kuwait appears to be incomplete, the finalisation of the maritime political geography of this region is a burning issue for the future. It is the first publication to include all the principal United Nations documents (and maps) relating to the UN's 'final' settlement and demarcation of the Iraq-Kuwait boundary during the 1991-1993 period (see volumes 1 & 4 and maps). All the important memoranda produced by the Cabinet, the Foreign Office, the Government of India and the India Office relating to Kuwait and the Baghdad Railway for the decade or so preceding the Anglo-Ottoman settlement of July 1913 have been brought together for the first time - many of these have not been published before (see volume 5).

    • Arrangement of Volumes

      CONTENTS OUTLINE

      Volume 1: Evolution of the Iraq-Kuwait boundary on land and sea, Part I: 1830-1936
      19th-century consideration of the geography and utility of the future Iraq-Kuwait borderlands, 1830-1866
      International status of Kuwait, 1899-1901
      The Anglo-Ottoman dispute over the sovereignty of Bubiyan and Warba islands and possible sites in their vicinity for a railway terminus, 1902-1911
      Early approximations of boundaries for Kuwait, 1906-1908
      Anglo-Ottoman negotiations towards a territorially defined Kuwait, 1911-1913
      Status of Kuwait and its northern territorial limits during the Great War and afterwards, 1914-1922
      Memoranda by the British Government on Kuwait, 1927-1922
      Inadequacies of the vaguely defined Iraq-Kuwait land boundary, 1931-1939
      The indeterminate Iraq-Kuwait water boundary, 1933-1936
      Volume 2: Evolution of the Iraq-Kuwait boundary on land and sea, Part II: 1936-1957
      Iraqi access to the Gulf and the islands of Warba and Bubiyan, 1938-1940
      Efforts to arrive at a more detailed land boundary delimitation, 1939-1952
      Umm Qasr, Warba and Bubiyan islands and Iraqi access to the Gulf, 1952-1957
      Incidents and conditions along the land border, 1954-1955
      Considerations of provisional seabed limits for Kuwait and Iraq, 1936-1948
      Volume 3: Evolution of the Iraq-Kuwait boundary on land and sea, Part III: 1949-1957
      Further considerations of continental shelf boundaries for the Gulf, 1949-1957
      Volume 4: Evolution of the Iraq-Kuwait boundary on land and sea, Part IV: 1958-1994
      Nuri Al-Said, the rise and fall of Qasim and the Iraq-Kuwait land boundary, 1958-1963
      Further proposals for seabed boundaries in the northern Gulf, 1958-1963
      Kuwaiti territorial waters, 1967
      Armed clashes on the land border and Kuwaiti fatalities, 1973
      Rumours of Iraq-Kuwait territorial deal denied, 1975
      The islands question during the 1908-1988 Iran-Iraq war
      The last concerted bilateral effort to broach the territorial disputes peaceably, 1989
      Public statements by Kuwaiti officials, 1991
      The United Nations settlement of the Iraq-Kuwait border, 1991-1993
      Volume 5: The international status of Kuwait, Part I: Britain, the Ottoman Empire, the Gulf and the Baghdad Railway, 1888-1913

      The international status of Kuwait: Britain, the Ottoman Empire and the Baghdad Railway, 1888-1913
      The limits of Ottoman jurisdiction along the western Gulf littoral, 1888-1903
      Shaikh Mubarak, Britain and the Ottoman Empire, 1896-1904
      The Baghdad Railway and the Persian Gulf, 1903-1913
      Volume 6: The international status of Kuwait, Part II: The Emergence of Kuwait as an independent state and the Iraqi claim to the entirety of Kuwait

      The emergence of Kuwait as an independent state and the Iraqi claim to the entirety of Kuwait,1914-1994
      Kuwait and Iraq-Najd relations, 1928-1930
      Kuwait date gardens in Iraq, 1930-1936
      Iraqi media calls for unification of Kuwait with Iraq, 1933-1939
      Britain reviews its existing commitments to the Ruler of Kuwait, 1933-1934
      Smuggling between Iraq and Kuwait, 1934 and 1948
      First official airing of Iraq's historical claim to the entirety of Kuwait, 1938-1939
      British review of problems in Iraq-Kuwait relations, 1952-1954
      Deterioration in Iraq-Kuwait relations, 1957
      Nuri Al-Said, Kuwait and the Hashimite Arab Union, 1958
      Iraq-Kuwait relations under Qasim, 1958-1951
      Redefinition of Kuwait's treaty relations with Britain, 1961
      Qasim resurrects Iraq's historical claim to the entirety of Kuwait, 1961, 1962
      Kuwait becomes member state of UN, Iraq formally recognizes Kuwait boundaries, 1963
      Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, 1990
      Persistence of Iraqi historical claim, 1993-1994

    • Key Documents

      MAPS

      01. Annex 5 to Anglo-Ottoman Convention of 29 July 1913: "Map to show limits of Kuwait and adjacent country": shows the red (inner) and green (outer) lines of diminishing Kuwaiti authority introduced by the articles of the convention relating to Kuwait: reprinted by the Foreign Office, May 1954

      02. Map annexed to "Final report on the demarcation of the international boundary between the Republic of Iraq and the State of Kuwait by the United Nations Iraq-Kuwait Boundary Demarcation Commission [UNIKBDC]", May 1993: map entitled "Demarcation of the international boundary between the Republic of Iraq and the State of Kuwait": shows the coordinates nominated by UNIKBDC to constitute the final delimitation of the Iraq-Kuwait boundary: printed by UNIKBDC, May 1993
      03. Map showing the divergence of views between the Foreign Office and the Government of India evident during 1941-1942 on where the land boundary should terminate on the Khor Zubair: "Iraq-Kuweit frontier (Umm Qasr)": printed by the Foreign Office, January 1948

      04. Map prepared by S W Boggs, Office of the Geographer at the State Department of the United States of America, showing tentative proposals for a division of the seabed of the Persian Gulf based upon a median-line division, June 1948: "Persian Gulf: tentative water boundary proposals": printed by the State Department, June 1948

      05. Map illustrating British Government's suggestion for the division of the seabed of the Persian Gulf, March 1949: "Asia: Persian Gulf": shows median lines, land frontiers, lateral lines and the 10 and 20 fathom lines: printed lines superimposed on existing Admiralty chart, March 1949

      06. Map showing proposals of the Admiralty for a possible delimitation of the Kuwaiti seabed area, January 1953: differing implications for Iraq-Kuwait maritime boundary depending upon whether division of the seabed was calculated utilising the following principles: i) Boggs-Kennedy report; ii) Boggs-Kennedy report principles; iii) median line between territorial water limits: pencil lines sketched upon existing Admiralty chart, January 1953

      07. Map showing further proposals of the Admiralty for a possible delimitation of the Kuwaiti seabed/offshore concession area, October 1953: Admiralty proposes "safe operating areas" in which the oil companies working the Kuwaiti continental shelf in the future might operate - "safe area" is well inside the Kuwaiti "minimum claim" area: pencil lines sketched upon existing Admiralty chart, October 1953

      08. Map showing further proposals of the Admiralty for a possible delimitation of the Kuwaiti seabed/offshore concession area, December 1953: shows maximum area of seabed which could reasonably be claimed by the Ruler of Kuwait: pencil lines sketched upon existing Admiralty chart, December 1953

      09-18 Selections covering the Iraq-Kuwait border region from the series of British Military Survey topographic maps of Kuwait (K-7611), 1990: submitted by the British Government to the United Nations as "appropriate materials" upon which the Secretary-General might draw when making arrangements for the final settlement of the Iraq-Kuwait boundary in March 1991: printed by the British Military Survey in 1990:

      09. Ash-Shiqaya - K7611 5348-III
      10. Al-Abraq - K7611 5348-I
      11. Wadi al-Baten - K7611 5349-II
      12. Houmah - K7611 5449-III
      13. Al-Huwaimliyah - K7611 5449-IV
      14. Umm al-Madafai - K7611 5449-I
      15. Ar-Raudhatain - K7611 5549-IV
      16. Umm Niqa - K7611 5549-I
      17. Jazirat Warbah - K7611 5649-IV
      18. Bubyan - K7611 5649-I

  • Editor

    R. Schofield

Sign In

Please sign in to access your account

Cancel

Not already registered? Create an account now. ×

Sorry, this resource is locked

Please register or sign in to request access. If you are having problems accessing these resources please email lecturers@cambridge.org

Register Sign in
Please note that this file is password protected. You will be asked to input your password on the next screen.

» Proceed

You are now leaving the Cambridge University Press website. Your eBook purchase and download will be completed by our partner www.ebooks.com. Please see the permission section of the www.ebooks.com catalogue page for details of the print & copy limits on our eBooks.

Continue ×

Continue ×

Continue ×

Find content that relates to you

Join us online

This site uses cookies to improve your experience. Read more Close

Are you sure you want to delete your account?

This cannot be undone.

Cancel

Thank you for your feedback which will help us improve our service.

If you requested a response, we will make sure to get back to you shortly.

×
Please fill in the required fields in your feedback submission.
×