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Riches, Poverty, and the Faithful
Perspectives on Wealth in the Second Temple Period and the Apocalypse of John

£25.99

Part of Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series

  • Date Published: October 2015
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781107567443

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  • In the book of Revelation, John appeals to the faithful to avoid the temptations of wealth, which he connects with evil and disobedience within secular society. New Testament scholars have traditionally viewed his somewhat radical stance as a reaction to the social injustices and idolatry of the imperial Roman cults of the day. Mark D. Mathews argues that John's rejection of affluence was instead shaped by ideas in the Jewish literature of the Second Temple period which associated the rich with the wicked and viewed the poor as the righteous. Mathews explores how traditions preserved in the Epistle of Enoch and later Enochic texts played a formative role in shaping John's theological perspective. This book will be of interest to those researching poverty and wealth in early Christian communities and the relationship between the traditions preserved in the Dead Sea Scrolls and New Testament.

    • Proposes a new approach to understanding John's language of wealth in the book of Revelation
    • Provides the background for how the language of wealth was used in Second Temple Jewish apocalyptic literature
    • Examines Jewish literature, both apocalyptic and otherwise, from the Second Temple period, including the Dead Sea Scrolls
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    '… there is much to be learnt from this careful study …' Paul Foster, The Expository

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    Product details

    • Date Published: October 2015
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781107567443
    • length: 294 pages
    • dimensions: 216 x 140 x 16 mm
    • weight: 0.34kg
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    Part I. Introduction:
    1. The question of wealth in the Apocalypse
    Part II. The Language of Wealth and Poverty in the Second Temple Period: Introduction
    2. Dead Sea Scrolls: non-sectarian Aramaic documents
    3. Dead Sea Scrolls: non-sectarian Hebrew documents
    4. Dead Sea Scrolls: sectarian Hebrew documents
    5. Other Jewish literature
    Preliminary conclusions
    Part III. Wealth, Poverty, and the Faithful Community in the Apocalypse of John: Introduction
    6. The language of wealth and poverty in the seven messages - Rev 2-3
    7. The present eschatological age - Rev 4-6
    8. Buying and selling in Satan's world - Rev 12-13, 18
    9. Final conclusions.

  • Author

    Mark D. Mathews, University of Durham
    Mark D. Mathews is Teaching Elder and Senior Pastor at Bethany Presbyterian Church in Oxford, Pennsylvania, USA. He is a member of the Society of Biblical Literature and Tyndale House Fellowship.

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