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Exclusion by Elections

Exclusion by Elections
Inequality, Ethnic Identity, and Democracy

AUD$43.95 inc GST

Part of Cambridge Studies in Comparative Politics

  • Date Published: May 2017
  • availability: Available
  • format: Paperback
  • isbn: 9781316633977

AUD$ 43.95 inc GST
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About the Authors
  • Exclusion by Elections develops a theory about the circumstances under which 'class identities' as opposed to 'ethnic identities' become salient in democratic politics, and links this theory to issues of inequality and the propensity of governments to address it. The book argues that in societies with even modest levels of ethnic diversity, inequality invites ethnic politics, and ethnic politics results in less redistribution than class politics. Thus, contrary to existing workhorse models in social science, where democracies are expected to respond to inequality by increasing redistribution, the argument here is that inequality interacts with ethnic diversity to discourage redistribution. As a result, inequality often becomes reinforced by inequality itself. The author explores the argument empirically by examining cross-national patterns of voting behaviour, redistribution and democratic transitions, and he discusses the argument's implications for identifying strategies that can be used to address rising inequality in the world today.

    • Presents a formal game theoretic model of 'identity politics' in elections in an accessible format for all types of readers
    • Proposes a new theory of how democracy responds to inequality, one that yields the opposite predictions of existing models
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    Product details

    • Date Published: May 2017
    • format: Paperback
    • isbn: 9781316633977
    • length: 224 pages
    • dimensions: 228 x 153 x 13 mm
    • weight: 0.33kg
    • contains: 55 b/w illus. 12 tables
    • availability: Available
  • Table of Contents

    1. Introduction
    2. Why worry about inequality and ethnic politics? Part I. The Theoretical Argument:
    3. Social structure and distributive politics in elections
    4. A theory of social structure, electoral identities and party systems
    5. Inequality, ethnic polarization and the democratic process
    Part II. Empirical Evidence for the Argument:
    6. Theory and causal identification
    7. Income and voting behavior
    8. Inequality, ethnic diversity and the ethnification of party systems
    9. Social structure, redistribution and democratic transitions
    10. Conclusion: inequality and the politics of exclusion.

  • Author

    John D. Huber, Columbia University, New York
    John D. Huber's research focuses on understanding how the social, political and institutional context affects the outcomes of democratic processes. Along with numerous articles, he is the author of two previous Cambridge University Press books, Rationalizing Parliament, Legislative Institutions and Party Politics in France (1996), and Deliberate Discretion? Institutional Foundations of Bureaucratic Autonomy (2002, with Charles Shipan).

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