mental health

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From a small seed to a giant Iroko tree: A postgraduate training programme in Child and Adolescent Mental Health in Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has the youngest population of any region in the world with 70% under the age of 30 years. This youthful demographic profile can be both a blessing and a challenge. While the youth have the potential to drive economic development, meeting their educational, social, and health needs can over-stretch already limited human and material resources.

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We Were In The Pits, But At Least There Was Company

In March 2017, a medical doctor ordered his driver to stop on the Third Mainland Bridge, came down from his car and jumped into the Lagos Lagoon. Traditional media platforms and social media buzzed with this tragic news. It was not the usual fare: that cocktail of pernicious poverty, drug use, and wanton criminality; this was a gentleman. It unveiled a severe concern about that taboo subject, mental health. 

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Uniting in Resilience: How Collective Belief Heals War’s Hidden Wounds

War doesn't merely result in physical devastation. The mental and emotional aftermath, particularly from modern warfare that targets civilians, is profound. Civilians suffer alongside combatants, facing deaths, injuries, chronic disability, multiple displacements with uprooting of whole communities, loss of homes, destruction of essential services, infrastructure and environment. These traumatic experiences lead to a wide range of mental health issues, from depression, anxiety, PTSD, and substance abuse to family and collective trauma impeding personal and community recovery.

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A Witness to My Inner Struggle

Puzzle was created during a admission It's a self-portrait, but the question is of what? Throughout my life, painting and the canvas have given me the the opportunity to let go and thus art has helped in my recovery.

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Cover Artwork: Faces

As Pictures Editor, I selected Peter Eddie's art for the August cover because of his intriguing drawings of faces and his enthusiastic use of any surface, here water cups. The rows of faces appear like an audience, looking out on us the viewer and reader of this journal.

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LONDON IS THE PLACE FOR ME 

My life as I knew it changed in the autumn of 2019. I started a new job in a new city in a new country. To further tip the scale, my aisle-destined engagement began to fail that summer, with unresolved conflicts sporadically rearing their heads in five cities on three continents. That summer, my laptop (and all my precious writing and dissertation) was stolen on a flight from London to Lagos.

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Wairua and Psychiatry: healing partners  

From my Māori world view, wairua or spirituality is our essence. Everything else flows out from there. If we don’t get spiritual wellbeing right, other approaches will have only limited benefit. It seems to me that psychiatry offers treatments that are focused on the brain, addressing physical and psychological wellbeing. I notice that western talking therapies often don’t address spiritual values that are of critical importance to Māori and other Indigenous peoples.

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Cover Artwork: Head in 4 Parts

As pictures editor, I selected Peter Grundy's art for the February cover because of his striking designs that simply portray complicated issues. Peter Grundy is one of the world's leading information designers. Peter Grundy states his designs and illustrations aim to turn complex information into simple visual stories in a world of modern messiness.

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Mindfully with Tunmise: Interview with Nigerian broadcaster and mental health advocate

The April edition of Muses – the arts blog from BJPsych International – features an interview with Tunmise Kuku, a Nigerian radio broadcaster and mental health advocate who has been open about her diagnosis of Type II Bipolar Affective Disorder. Three years ago, she took a deliberate career break to write Living Mindfully: A Journey of Being, a memoir that draws from her experiences and stories. It has been lightly edited for length and clarity.

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Cover Artwork: Albert

In this edition of Muses – the arts blog from BJPsych International – Dr Tim McInerny, Pictures Editor, BJPsych International introduces Albert, the artist whose portrait is on the cover of the February 2023 issue of BJPsych International.

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Higher rates of involuntary psychiatric hospital admission among minoritised ethnic groups are not explained by lack of access to care

The RCPsych Article of the Month for January is ‘Ethnic inequalities in involuntary admission under the Mental Health Act: an exploration of mediation effects of clinical care prior to the first admission’ and the blog is written by authors Daniela Fonseca Freitas, Susan Walker, Patrick Nyikavaranda, Johnny Downs, Rashmi Patel, Mizanur Khondoker, Kamaldeep Bhui and Richard D. Hayes. The article is published in The British Journal of Psychiatry.

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Cover Artwork: ‘Medusa’ by Sarah Kogan

In the November edition of Muses – the arts blog from BJPsych International – Dr Tim McInerny, Pictures Editor, BJPsych International introduces Sarah Kogan, the artist whose portrait is on the cover of the November edition of BJPsych International. 

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On the cover of the February 2022 issue of BJPsych International

As pictures editor I selected Courtney’s art as it is a powerful, beautiful, enigmatic image of identity and mental health. It is difficult to make an artwork that sensitively visualises the experience of illness and recovery. Courtney’s work does both, in a strong portrait that immediately gains attention. It is a fitting cover and I am proud that a patient artist has created this work that speaks so clearly to the international audience of the journal.

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Rix’s Expert Psychiatric Evidence

This week at London’s Central Criminal Court, or the Old Bailey as it is known, I was asked by another expert why the judges all wear black robes instead of the colourful dress of other circuit judges and why they are addressed as ‘My Lord’ or ‘My Lady’ instead of ‘Your Honour’.…

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So Young, So Sad, So Listen

This is not an easy time for many children and parents. We hope our book ‘So Young, So Sad, So Listen’ can help parents recognise depression in their children, work out why this is happening and what can be done about it.

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What leads to young people taking their own lives?

Worldwide suicide is most common in young people, and in many places rates of self-harm and suicide are rising, especially in girls. With this in mind, we wanted to explore the characteristics of suicide in young people, including gender differences and contacts with services that could play a part in prevention.

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A mental health crisis in Lesbos

The RCPsych Article of the Month for December is from BJPsych International and is entitled ‘Headaches in Moria: a reflection on mental healthcare in the refugee camp population of Lesbos' by Tom Nutting.

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To Decide or Not to Decide- That is the Question

The Mental Capacity Act was always meant to be an enabling piece of legislation, providing carers, health and social care professionals, a legal umbrella to support what they have been doing for years when supporting individuals who lack capacity to make such decisions for themselves.

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Round up of #RCPsychIC

We were delighted to welcome delegates to our Cambridge University Press/RCPsych Publishing stand during Congress where they were able to explore our impressive portfolio of books and journals and meet the Journal Editors-in-Chief and Managing Editors during “Meet the Editor” sessions.

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Fish’s Clinical Psychopathology

In 2005, I received a phone call from Patricia Casey, Professor (now Emeritus) of Psychiatry at University College Dublin. Would I be interested in working on a new edition of Fish’s Clinical Psychopathology with her? I stood up at once - the gravity of the occasion clearly required this - and I answered with the most emphatic Yes that I have ever uttered (apart from my wedding vows, of course). Certainly, I would revise Fish with her. Could we start today?

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Discrediting Experiences

The RCPsych Article of the Month for March is from BJPsych Open and is entitled ‘Discrediting experiences: outcomes of eligibility assessments for claimants with psychiatric compared with non-psychiatric conditions transferring to personal independence payments in England'

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How We Can Develop and Effectively Disseminate CBT

As part of Mental Illness Awareness Week, the Cognitive Behaviour Therapist (tCBT) is focussing on an issue central to the remit of the journal – namely how can we develop and effectively disseminate CBT and also how we can support the delivery of this group of therapies for individuals with mental illness or psychological distress.…

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The Spanish Journal of Psychology honors Mental Illness Awareness Week

Mental health problems in childhood and adolescence are increasingly the object of preferential study by Spanish professionals. Sensitivity towards cases of child abuse both within the domestic and institutional sphere has grown enormously and has produced a preferential attention towards the associated mental disorders and their consequences, such as suicidal behavior.…

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Special Issue of the Cognitive Behaviour Therapist on Complexity within Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

When I first took over as Editor-in-Chief of the Cognitive Behaviour Therapist (tCBT), I was extremely excited to hear that there was already a planned (and almost completed) forthcoming Special Issue on Complexity in Cognitive Behaviour Therapist (CBT) being Guest Edited by Claire Lomax and Stephen Barton from Newcastle University, UK (Lomax & Barton, 2017).…

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Where There Is No Psychiatrist

The newly published second edition of Where There is No Psychiatrist is a practical manual of mental health care for community health workers, primary care nurses, social workers and primary care doctors, particularly in low-resource settings. Authors Vikram Patel and Charlotte Hanlon discuss the importance of this manual below.

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UK Biobank gives unparalleled potential for future biomedical research in mental health

Until now, UK Biobank, a health data resource aiming to help scientists discover why some people develop particular diseases and others do not, had limited mental health data to work with. Following 157,366 responses to an online mental health questionnaire (MHQ) developed by researchers from King’s College London, alongside collaborators from across the UK, it now has unparalleled potential for further biomedical research in mental health, dramatically expanding potential research into mental disorders. The findings have been published in BJPsych Open.

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1 in 4 pregnant women have mental health problems

A new King’s College London study published Thursday 4 January in The British Journal of Psychiatry, found that 1 in 4 pregnant women have mental health problems. This is more common than previously thought – but two simple questions can help identify these problems so that women can be treated.

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Researchers find lifestyle link in depression

Researchers following the progress of 1200 people for five years have found strong links between unhealthy lifestyles and depression. Researchers at the University of Tasmania’s Menzies Institute for Medical Research studied the impact of lifestyle on depression and the impact of depression on lifestyle.…

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Criminal behavior: Older siblings strongly sway younger siblings close in age | VCU Across the Spectrum

Findings illustrate impact of family environment on violent criminal behavior If a sibling commits a violent criminal act, the risk that a younger sibling may follow in their footsteps is more likely than the transmission of that behavior to an older sibling, according to a new study conducted by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University and Lund University in Sweden.…

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