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VIII.145 - Trichinosis

from Part VIII - Major Human Diseases Past and Present

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2008

Kenneth F. Kiple
Affiliation:
Bowling Green State University, Ohio
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Summary

Trichinosis, also known as trichinellosis, trichiniasis, or trichinelliasis, is a disease of humans and of other mammals infected with the nematode worm Trichinella spiralis. The pathological changes and the symptomatology of Trichinella infection are manifestations of three successive stages in the life history of the worm: (1) penetration of adult female worms into the intestinal mucosa, (2) migration of juvenile worms, and (3) penetration of juvenile worms and subsequent encystment in muscle cells.

Distribution and Incidence

Although trichinosis occurs worldwide, in humans it is found principally in the United States, Canada, and eastern Europe. It is also well known in Mexico, parts of South America, Africa, southern Asia, and the Middle East. People acquire trichinae by ingesting uncooked or poorly cooked meat, especially pork. Home-made sausages have caused many recent outbreaks in the United States. Hence, the prevalence of trichinosis is less in the tropics and subtropics, where less meat is consumed. Trichinosis does not occur among Hindus, Jews, and Moslems, for whom there are religious bans on eating pork.

Although the prevalence of trichinosis in human populations is low (probably 2.2 percent or less in the United States, based on autopsy surveys), epidemic outbreaks are not infrequent. Incidence of infection is likely to be higher than suspected because of the vagueness of symptoms, which usually suggest other conditions.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1993

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References

Blumer, G. 1939. Some remarks on the early history of trichinosis (1822-1866). Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine 11.Google Scholar
Brown, Harold W., and Neva, Franklin A.. 1983. Basic clinical parasitology. Norwalk, Conn.Google Scholar
Campbell, W. C, ed. 1982. Trichinellosis. New York.Google Scholar
Chandler, Asa C. 1940. Introduction to parasitology. New York.Google Scholar
Gould, S. E., ed. 1970. Trichinosis in man and animals. Springfield, Ill.Google Scholar
Reinhard, Edward G. 1958. Landmarks of parasitology. II. Demonstration of the life cycle and pathogenicity of the spiral threadworm. Experimental Parasitology 7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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  • Trichinosis
  • Edited by Kenneth F. Kiple, Bowling Green State University, Ohio
  • Book: The Cambridge World History of Human Disease
  • Online publication: 28 March 2008
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521332866.207
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  • Trichinosis
  • Edited by Kenneth F. Kiple, Bowling Green State University, Ohio
  • Book: The Cambridge World History of Human Disease
  • Online publication: 28 March 2008
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521332866.207
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Trichinosis
  • Edited by Kenneth F. Kiple, Bowling Green State University, Ohio
  • Book: The Cambridge World History of Human Disease
  • Online publication: 28 March 2008
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CHOL9780521332866.207
Available formats
×