Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-swr86 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-23T03:11:53.906Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

4 - Slavery

from Part I - Global histories

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2015

Craig Benjamin
Affiliation:
Grand Valley State University, Michigan
Get access

Summary

Slaves could be found in simpler societies, but more important and better known was the existence of slavery in most advanced states. This chapter discusses the spectrum of different types and levels of slave use. It focuses on slavery in pre-state societies and the correlation between slavery and cities, trade, and empires. Historians often distinguish between slave societies and societies with slaves. New World slavery was agricultural and can seem atavistic and primitive in comparison with contemporaneous industrialization with its wage laborers and technology. The growth of state power, like the growth of cities, typically went hand in hand with the increasing inequalities both of wealth and power that produced an elite who might desire slaves for their lifestyle, status, or profit. The racism directed against black Africans in New World slave systems was a modern, relatively systematic, and extreme example of a much more common attitude toward slaves.
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Primary Sources

Bradley, Keith, and Cartlege, Paul (eds.), Cambridge World History of Slavery, Cambridge University Press, 2011, vol. i.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cameron, Catherine M., “Captives and Cultural Change: Implications for Archaeology,” Current Anthropology 52 (2011): 169209.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dal Lago, Enrico, and Katsari, Constantina (eds.), Slave Systems: Ancient and Modern, Cambridge University Press, 2008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Finkelman, Paul, and Miller, Joseph Calder (eds.), Macmillan Encyclopedia of World Slavery, 2 vols., New York: Macmillan Reference, 1998.Google Scholar
Garnsey, Peter, Ideas of Slavery from Aristotle to Augustine, Cambridge University Press, 1996.Google Scholar
Heuman, Gad, and Burnard, Trevor (eds.), The Routledge History of Slavery, Oxford: Routledge, 2011.Google Scholar
Patterson, Orlando, Slavery and Social Death, Cambridge, ma: Harvard University Press, 1982.Google Scholar
Rodriguez, Junius (ed.), The Historical Encyclopedia of World Slavery, Santa Barbara, ca: ABC-CLIO, 1997.Google Scholar
Watson, James L. (ed.), Asian and African Systems of Slavery, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980.Google Scholar

Secondary Sources

Baker, H. D., “Degrees of Freedom: Slavery in Mid-first Millennium BC Babylonia,” World Archaeology 33 (2001): 1826.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bradley, Keith, Slavery and Society at Rome, Cambridge University Press, 1994.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cohen, Edward E., The Athenian Nation, Princeton University Press, 2000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crone, Patricia, Slaves on Horses: The Evolution of the Islamic Polity, Cambridge University Press, 1980.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dandamaev, Muhammad, Slavery in Babylonia: From Nabopolassar to Alexander the Great (626–331 bc), trans. Powell, Victoria, DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1984.Google Scholar
Donald, Leland, Aboriginal Slavery on the Northwest Coast of North America, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997.Google Scholar
Finley, M. I., “Was Greek Civilisation Based on Slave Labour?” in Shaw, Brent D. and Saller, Richard P. (eds.), Economy and Society in Ancient Greece, New York: Viking Press, 1982, pp. 97115.Google Scholar
Fisher, N. R. E., Slavery in Classical Greece, ed. Gunningham, Michael, London: Duckworth / Bristol Classical Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Galil, Gershon, The Lower Stratum Families in the Neo-Assyrian Period, ed. Schneider, Thomas, Leiden: Brill, 2007.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gordon, Matthew S., “Preliminary Remarks on Slaves and Slave Labor in the Third/Ninth Century ‘Abbãsid Empire,’” in Culbertson, Laura (ed.), Slaves and Households in the Near East, Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, 2011, pp. 7184.Google Scholar
Harris, William V., “Geography and the Sources of Roman Slaves,” Journal of Roman Studies 89 (1999): 6275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hezser, Catherine, Jewish Slavery in Antiquity, Oxford University Press, 2005.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hopkins, Keith, Conquerors and Slaves: Sociological Studies in Roman History, Cambridge University Press, 1978, vol. i.Google Scholar
Joshel, Sandra R., Slavery in the Roman World, Cambridge University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
Loprieno, Antonio, “Slaves,” in Donadoni, Sergio (ed.), The Egyptians, University of Chicago Press, 1997, pp. 185219.Google Scholar
Markoe, Glenn E., Phoenicians, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006.Google Scholar
Pulleybank, E. G., “The Origins and Nature of Chattel Slavery in China,” Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient 1 (1958): 185220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Roth, Ulrike, Thinking Tools: Agricultural Slavery between Evidence and Models, London: Institute of Classical Studies, 2007.Google Scholar
Scheidel, Walter, “Quantifying the Sources of Slaves in the Early Roman Empire,” Journal of Roman Studies 87 (1997): 156–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weaver, P. R. C., Familia Caesaris: A Social Study of the Emperor’s Freedmen and Slaves, Cambridge University Press, 1972.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Slavery
  • Edited by Craig Benjamin, Grand Valley State University, Michigan
  • Book: The Cambridge World History
  • Online publication: 05 May 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139059251.006
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Slavery
  • Edited by Craig Benjamin, Grand Valley State University, Michigan
  • Book: The Cambridge World History
  • Online publication: 05 May 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139059251.006
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Slavery
  • Edited by Craig Benjamin, Grand Valley State University, Michigan
  • Book: The Cambridge World History
  • Online publication: 05 May 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139059251.006
Available formats
×